Episcopalians bring spiritual urgency to youth-led climate strikes

first_imgEpiscopalians bring spiritual urgency to youth-led climate strikes Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group center_img The Rev. Deborah Warner, rector of the Church of the Messiah, speaks at a climate strike event in Falmouth, Massachusetts, on Sept. 20, 2019. Photo: Egan Millard/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Falmouth, Massachusetts] A wave of youth-led protests against political inaction on the climate crisis that drew hundreds of thousands to the streets of cities around the world rolled into this usually quiet Cape Cod town when about 160 people gathered on the village green for a boisterous rally on Sept. 20.Participants hold creative signs at a climate strike event in Falmouth, Massachusetts, on Sept. 20, 2019. Photo: Egan Millard/Episcopal News ServiceThe participants, from toddlers to senior citizens, waved signs with messages like “DECLARE A CLIMATE EMERGENCY” and “THERE ARE NO JOBS ON A DEAD PLANET.” They beat drums and sang songs. They delivered impassioned speeches through a megaphone as passing cars honked in support. And when the clock struck 11 a.m., the bells of St. Barnabas Episcopal Church, which overlooks the green, began to ring. St. Barnabas, along with over a dozen other churches across Cape Cod, tolled its bells for 11 minutes, signifying that it is now “the 11th hour” and urgent, swift action is needed to avert catastrophe.Video Playerhttps://episcopalnewsservice.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/P1030485.mp400:0000:0000:13Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.The cacophony was inescapable – and that was exactly the point.“Church bells have historically been a clarion call to action, a way to bring attention to situations,” said the Rev. Will Mebane Jr., rector of St. Barnabas. “We have a crisis here. Ringing church bells for 11 minutes on a Friday morning as people drive by, walk by – [they go,] ‘What? What’s going on?’ So it’s a way to get attention and to just elevate the consciousness of people.”The Rev. Will Mebane Jr., rector of St. Barnabas Episcopal Church, speaks to a participant at a climate strike event in Falmouth, Massachusetts, on Sept. 20, 2019. Photo: Egan Millard/Episcopal News ServiceFalmouth is especially aware of the threat it faces from climate change, not only because of its coastal location but also because it is home to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, one of the world’s most renowned marine science centers, and several other scientific institutions that together have produced some of the most important research on climate change.A group of high school students speak to the crowd at a climate strike event in Falmouth, Massachusetts, on Sept. 20, 2019. Photo: Egan Millard/Episcopal News ServiceSpeakers at the rally included scientists who have contributed to that research, a group of students from local high schools – some of whom had risked a three-day suspension by attending – and the Rev. Deborah Warner, rector of the Church of the Messiah, another Episcopal parish in town.Participants wore life jackets and other flotation devices to symbolize the urgent threat of sea level rise at a climate strike event in Falmouth, Massachusetts, on Sept. 20, 2019. Photo: Egan Millard/Episcopal News Service“There is no more crucial issue facing the entire world than this,” Warner told the strikers, many of whom wore life jackets and other flotation devices to symbolize the urgent threat of sea level rise. “People like to say it’s either economics or it’s the environment. That’s the same conversation.”Warner borrowed an image from the theologian Sally McVeigh to illustrate the importance of respecting creation.“We can look at the Earth as a hotel, where everything is disposable, or it is our home,” Warner said. “For the sake of the children and the young people that we hear, and their children and their grandchildren, we need to stand up and speak out and raise hell!”Meanwhile, in Minneapolis, the House of Bishops interrupted its fall meeting for a moment of solidarity with the strikers. About 100 bishops gathered outside their hotel to pray and sing, having released a statement in support of the strikes the day before, and Presiding Bishop Michael Curry spoke about the Christian responsibility to protect the Earth.“We are bishops of The Episcopal Church. And we are leaders who share leadership with other clergy and lay people in the church. But we are not here today as leaders. We’re here as followers. We’re here to follow the youth mobilization on climate change. We’re here to follow and support what they are doing to stand in solidarity with them,” Curry said. “[Jesus] said, ‘God so loved the world’ – not just part of the world, but the whole world. This is God’s world, and we must care for it and take care of it and heal it and love it, just as God loves it.”In New York, Lynnaia Main, The Episcopal Church’s representative to the United Nations, was one of the tens of thousands who marched through the streets of Manhattan.“The climate strikes happening worldwide today are an important opportunity for people to mobilize and raise their voices to demand that we all take action to address the climate emergency that is upon us,” Main told Episcopal News Service. “Notice that I did not say that people are striking to mobilize governments. That is true, but people are also mobilizing to mobilize each other.”Sixteen year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg takes part in a demonstration as part of the Global Climate Strike in New York on Sept. 20, 2019. Photo: Shannon Stapleton/ReutersThe crowds in New York – where the United Nations will hold a special climate summit starting on Sept. 23 – were full of young people who had been given excused absences from the city’s public schools. Young people – inspired by 16-year-old Greta Thunberg, who was scheduled to speak at the New York event – led the charge at many of the rallies and marches, from major cities to small towns.Students and staff at the Rock Point School in Burlington, Vermont – affiliated with the Diocese of Vermont – participated in that city’s strike, as did young parishioners at All Saints Church in Pasadena, California. Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Students at St. Stephen’s Episcopal School in Austin, Texas, organized their own walkout on the school’s campus.And students from Trinity Episcopal School in Charlotte, North Carolina, walked to Charlotte’s Government Center with a large cutout of Thunberg and homemade signs.Though some were too young to spell correctly, their message was clear.“Act like parins [sic] or we will for you!” read one Trinity student’s sign.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] David Paulsen contributed reporting to this story from Minneapolis, Minnesota. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ By Egan MillardPosted Sep 20, 2019 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Environment & Climate Change last_img read more

Q&A: Washington Bishop Mariann Budde says church should ‘lead with…

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Washington Bishop Mariann Edgar Budde, right, recites prayers at the first Way of the Cross station March 21, 2013, in Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C. Budde, joined by Connecticut Bishop Suffragan James Curry, left, and Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, was part of a procession against violence months after the massacre of students and teachers at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Many Episcopal bishops, priests and deacons feel called by faith to bear public witness on issues of the day, but few have been as prominent or outspoken in recent years as Diocese of Washington Bishop Mariann Budde. As the top Episcopal leader in the nation’s capital, Budde hasn’t been shy in calling for federal policies that reflect Jesus’ call to care “for the least of these.”Budde, in an interview with Episcopal News Service, said she has tried to “lead with Jesus” rather than let politics guide her ordained ministry, going back to her 18 years as a parish priest in Minneapolis, Minnesota. “If your Jesus always agrees with your politics, you’re probably not reading deeply enough into Jesus,” she said. At the same time, “I don’t think justice and societal issues are optional for clergy. They are embedded in our faith.”Since her consecration as Washington bishop in 2011, she said she has tried to focus on her primary role as chief pastor to the diocese’s Episcopalians. When engaging in advocacy, though, church leaders should “take a moral position and not a partisan position, to start somewhere we have authority,” Budde said.Budde and other church leaders also are responding to calls for healing after the recent presidential campaign and its tense aftermath. ENS spoke with Budde on Jan. 13, one week after a deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol by supporters of then-President Donald Trump and a week before the inauguration of President Joe Biden.The following questions and answers have been condensed and lightly edited for length and clarity.ENS: The Diocese of Washington is like any other diocese in that it covers a geographic area and encompasses a number of congregations and members, but it also is home to the seat of the U.S. government. Does that shape how you see your role as bishop of the diocese?The Rt. Rev. Mariann Budde was consecrated as bishop of the Diocese of Washington in 2011. Photo: Washington National CathedralBUDDE: The Diocese of Washington goes all the way down to southern Maryland. I wish it had a different name, actually – “The Diocese of Washington and Four Maryland Counties.” I mean, there are a lot of people whose profession is government in one form or another, and not just the political, elected side but the civil service side. The temptation is greater to focus on what’s happening on the federal side of the government, and that’s something that I’ve tried not to define my episcopate [by]. I’m not a chaplain to the government, I’m the pastor of pastors and a leader of congregations. I tend to pick my issues carefully.ENS: If you look back at the examples of bishops before you, several of them also spoke out on issues of their time. I’m thinking of Bishop John Walker in the late 1970s and 1980s and Bishop John Chane in the 2000s.BUDDE: Bishop Walker is a real model for me, and not simply his moral courage and his social justice leadership, which was iconic, but it was in the context of a very broad ministry. He loved children, he loved parish priests, he loved congregations. He was a man of tremendous grace, so I looked to him quite a bit. I think of him more than anyone, in terms of who has occupied this office.ENS: It seems like Chane, your most recent predecessor, might have had a different approach?BUDDE: This is no disrespect to Bishop Chane, because he had a phenomenal ministry, particularly on the world stage and in the Middle East and issues of Middle East peace, tremendous influence and importance. But I dare say that one of the reasons I was elected was I was not John Chane. It was a real pendulum swing for the diocese in the sense that they wanted somebody whose primary commitment was congregational life and vitality, and that the bishop was going to spend the majority of her time working to revitalize congregations. And that was my commitment to them. That’s what my passion, my sense of call, was.ENS: Do you still feel that today?BUDDE: I do. And I feel that the public witness is only as strong as we are strong. It doesn’t really matter how articulate a bishop is if she doesn’t have behind her strong, vibrant congregations who are making a difference in their communities and who can mobilize for the benefit of their neighborhoods and towns. And I also think the witness is stronger if there’s more than one voice.ENS: Do you provide any guidance to clergy in the diocese about how to approach political issues and when it is or isn’t appropriate to speak out from the pulpit or in public?BUDDE: In the context of our orientation for clergy new to the diocese and those newly ordained, I discuss the spiritual practice and vocation of preaching and stewardship of the pulpit. In that context, I share my approach and philosophy about speaking into politics and other topics of social concern, but that is only one dimension of preaching that I discuss. Stewardship of the pulpit is essential for good pastoral leadership.ENS: Is there an expectation for the bishop of Washington to speak out a little bit more? That U.S. politics is part of your mission field?BUDDE: Yep, happens all the time. And sometimes I answer to that, and sometimes I take a pass. And I try to do it based on the issues that the constituency I serve has some real expertise or experience with, or issues that are absolutely representative of who they are. Issues of racial justice, for example, are embedded in the life of this diocese, so if I were not committed to that, I’d be the wrong bishop. Immigration reform is an issue that affects not only the moral fabric of our country but the lives of people who are in our congregations.The Rt. Rev. Mariann Budde, bishop of Washington, raises her hand in prayer outside St. John’s Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C., on June 14, 2020. Photo: Jack Jenkins/RNSENS: Certainly, there is a risk that Episcopal leaders may be seen as being too political. People use the term “political,” but what I think they mean is “partisan.” A lot of the policy positions that the church has taken seem to be aligned with Democratic positions. I suppose you can’t be blamed for which party takes which position, but you must think about that. How do you respond?BUDDE: I think it’s a fair critique, let me just say that. Some leadership of The Episcopal Church, we tend to be more Matthew 25 Christians. We tend to be ones who talk about how we treat our fellow human beings and how we care for the poor and how we clothe the naked – all of those things that Jesus talks about in Matthew 25, as opposed to John 3:16 Christians, “for God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son, to the end that all who believe in him shall not perish, but have eternal life.” Those are the two classic definitions of what it means to follow Jesus. My public stance is more in line with the former because it seems to be the more universally compassionate position that aligns itself with the common good. And I am concerned about a very distorted view of Christianity that has the nation’s attention, and I do feel some responsibility to say there’s more than one way to live a public life as a Christian. I actually spend a lot of my time studying, reading and learning from Christian evangelicals, because many of them are way better than we are on some of the things that build healthy congregations. And I’ve learned that there’s a very broad swath of people and leadership styles and public leadership perspective within the white evangelical world. It’s not some big monolithic bloc. But all Christians must reject what we saw on Jan. 6 [at the U.S. Capitol].ENS: Do you think that faith can be a healing force in this time of extreme polarization? It could be a dividing force, but what are the ways you think that it can be a healing force?BUDDE: One of the things about religion is it can be all those things. It can be in service to our highest aspirations and to our most base behaviors. Of course religion can be a healing force. It’s the strongest of healing forces. One of my colleagues says, “There ought to be space for grace.” Religion, at its best, gives a way to talk about how we fail and how we start again and how we can be drawn back from behaviors that we regret and how we can find a place of healing, sometimes not by dealing with the conflict directly but coming at it indirectly. That’s what I see Joe Biden trying to do. I think he’s trying to say, “I’m going to do my best to find a way to bring us together according to the things that we really do value as a people.” I don’t think he’s perfect, but I hear him trying to do that and I pray for his success.ENS: Looking forward, how do you balance the desire to let your faith lead you toward that place of healing and at the same time look back on what has happened and say, “That’s not what I think we should be”? Is that in conflict?BUDDE: It’s somewhat in conflict, but I also feel there’s a process of reconciliation. You don’t just pick yourself up from pummeling someone and then say, “Let’s make peace.” There are consequences and accountability that do need to take place before we can have kind of a deep reconciliation. And I think that we’re learning that with our generational struggle with racial inequity. I feel that in some way we have to allow the people who have been most grievously wounded a chance to heal and to make sure that there’s safety and restitution. Healing is a byproduct of work and time. It can’t be decreed by a person saying, “It’s time for healing.” You actually have to work at it.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Submit a Job Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Faith & Politics Tags Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Q&A: Washington Bishop Mariann Budde says church should ‘lead with Jesus’ in its nonpartisan advocacy Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL By David PaulsenPosted Feb 4, 2021 center_img Donald Trump, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Featured Eventslast_img read more

Church of England to spend $1.2 million to reach unchurched…

first_imgChurch of England to spend $1.2 million to reach unchurched young adults and students Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL [Church of England] Tens of thousands of students and young people who may never have been to church before are to be reached by the Church of England with the message of the Christian faith as part of a $1.2 million funding program for mission projects across the country announced May 20.Church of England parishes are to form new congregations aimed at reaching young adults and students in Leeds and Huddersfield in West Yorkshire, Blackburn in Lancashire and coastal areas of Paignton in Devon and Brighton and Hove in east Sussex.The grants are part of the church’s program of Renewal and Reform.Read the full news release here. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Posted May 20, 2021 Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Servicelast_img read more

Apopka High School Debate Team Reaches Their Goals

first_img Previous articleApopka Celebrates the 4th of July with Fireworks and MusicNext articleAre You an Aquaholic? Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 The Apopka High School Debate Team has recently conquered two mountains.First, three team members qualified to compete in the National Speech & Debate Association National Tournament in Salt Lake City next week.The second accomplishment was raising the funds necessary to travel to the tournament.The photo shows David Rankin and Bryan Nelson presenting Cathy Brown, Debate Coach, with two $500 checks.  One from the Rotary Club of Apopka and the other from the John Land Apopka Community Trust.Team members Ethan Uhlig and Morgan Donaghy are competing in Policy Debate.  Christopher Hamilton is competing in World Schools Debate, which is much like Parliamentary Debate in college.Policy Debate is a two-on-two debate that focuses on a selected policy question for the duration of the academic year. The format tests a student’s research, analytical, and delivery skills. Policy Debate involves the proposal of a plan by the affirmative team to enact a policy, while the negative team offers reasons to reject that proposal. Throughout the debate, students have the opportunity to cross-examine one another. A judge or panel of judges determines the winner based on the arguments presented.This year’s Policy Debate topic involved domestic surveillance by the U.S. government.Ethan and Morgan qualified for this at a National Speech & Debate Association qualifying tournament held in Florida earlier this spring.The World Schools Debate is a unique and dynamic form of debate, unlike any other practiced in the United States. World Schools Debate features a dynamic format combining the concepts of “prepared” topics with “impromptu” topics, encouraging debaters to focus on specified issues rather than debate theory or procedural arguments. This highly interactive style of debate allows debaters to engage each other, even during speeches. This challenging format requires good teamwork and in-depth quality argumentation.Christopher qualified for this because he was an alternate at the National Speech & Debate Association Congress qualifier held in the Spring. He will join other students from Timber Creek High School to form a World Schools Debate team. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your name here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your comment!last_img read more

City Council undecided on Apopka Police Department’s budget

first_img July 20, 2017 at 1:08 pm Reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Reply Reply Mama Mia 8 COMMENTS Why didn’t the mayor just go ahead and accept the $ 60,000 settlement at the mediation along with the city attorney present there at the mediation, I’ll never know???? All this mess would have been over, but the mayor wanted to bring in “the community” through the city council’s votes, as the community’s representatives. So in the event that Anderson wins, the mayor wouldn’t have been the sole decision maker, if he chose to go to court with a trial. The council was dragged into when the mayor had it put on the agenda and called for their votes……unbelievable, after the mayor had agreed to the settlement during the mediation?????? Please enter your name here Amazing isn’t it that Orange County’s budget allows for 100 new police and fire department employees, some percentage of a raise requested by Sheriff Demings for the Orange Co. sheriffs, and yet the Orange Co. Commission is NOT going to raise the millage rate on our Orange Co. citizens because the taxable values of properties are increasing, and will make up the differences needed plus all the new growth and what those new homes, apartments, and businesses will bring in additional revenues …. Our Apopka City Council needs to take a BIG hint, if Orange County government can do it, the City of Apopka Council can keep the millage rate the same also…..I’ll title this opinion of mine……”YOU ALL ARE NOT FOOLING ME” on this budget. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. July 20, 2017 at 4:19 pm Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom July 20, 2017 at 10:00 am July 20, 2017 at 11:37 am I am very disappointed in the vengefulness of the Apopka City Commissioners who voted against settling the lawsuit with Anderson to end this crap, that continues…..and that is what it is, vengefulness! So nice to know you all are so moral and perfect, and the talk of Richard” won’t go away” by Velazquez….very disappointing……why should Richard “go away” ??? He spent his life raised here, and working here in this city, so why should he “go away”? Reply July 20, 2017 at 3:46 pm Reply Mama Mia Reply center_img Mama MIa UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Mama Mia Please enter your comment! Mama MIa July 20, 2017 at 3:52 pm Adds $90,000 to proposed budget for vests, helmets, and tasers; replacement vehicles on holdAusterity collided with reality on Tuesday, and the result of the crash could change the trajectory of Apopka’s 2017-18 fiscal budget.At the fifth City Council budget meeting, Apopka Chief of Police Michael McKinley gave a sobering presentation of a department in dire need of upgrades in many areas including personnel, ballistics, and particularly in vehicles.Despite a proposed $15,490,371 APD budget for Fiscal Year 2017-18, which represents approximately 35% of the General Fund, McKinley believes there are essential areas that risk both the success and safety of his agency. The APD is dealing with an aging fleet of vehicles that includes 28 over 10 years old, and 36 with over 100,000 miles. Two unmarked vehicles were totaled in crashes last year and not replaced. They also have tasers that are out of warranty, 35 rifles at the end of their life expectancy (which is 33% of the rifle arsenal), a need for a higher level of ballistic vest for first responders, an officer/population ration that is below the Florida average, and an entry level officer salary average that is falling behind other agencies.“The proposed budget is going to leave the department with some challenges,” he said. “I know there was talk of cutting into the fat, but I think this budget cuts into the muscle too.”McKinley’s amended requests above the proposed budget were:2 new police officersLevel IV ballistic vests and kevlar helmets for first responders (sergeant and below)6 patrol sedans6 patrol SUV’s2 unmarked vehicles, plus two additional unmarked vehicles to replace the totaled vehicles1 canine vehicle1 SRO vehicleTasers to replace the out of warranty tasersThe Council added the vests, helmets, and tasers, which added $90,000 to the APD budget. However, the vehicle request was put on a “wish list” to be decided on after the budget meetings are concluded. The vehicle requests will add $670,000 to the APD’s budget.Earlier in the discussion, both McKinley and City Administrator Glenn Irby illustrated the importance of upgrading the aging APD vehicle fleet.“A pursuit vehicle with over 125,000 miles is beginning to reach a danger element,” said McKinley.Irby agreed with McKinley’s assessment.“Two of the biggest liabilities in our budget are the police and fire departments,” he said. “But it can actually be tilted even worse when their equipment is not adequate. There are times when (vehicle) pursuits will go on, and if those cars are falling apart, we’ll be looking at a larger liability. They need the equipment.”The budget meetings conclude on Thursday with the Fire Department making its presentation, and then an expected discussion on the items on the “wish list” to finalize the budget amounts for each department, which include the police vehicles requested by McKinley. That will be followed by a vote to set the millage rate for the 2017-18 fiscal budget. Reply July 20, 2017 at 3:56 pm Mama MIa TAGSApopka City CouncilApopka Police Department Previous article3rd Annual Simulation Summit coming in SeptemberNext articleAPD Arrest Report Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Also how much Apopka taxpayer money is going to be WASTED on fighting on with the Richard Anderson lawsuit fiasco? A VERY BAD decision rendered by the mayor, Velazquez, and Becker with their votes not to settle the lawsuit and give this subject a rest, once and for all, that has been a black cloud hanging over our city and causing more division in our city…..ENOUGH! Very illogical on their parts, especially since both parties’ representatives agreed to the settlement at the court- ordered mediation, then Velazquez, Becker, and the mayor vote against the pre-agreed terms, at the city council …..????? I guess this is the REAL reason the council might decide to INCREASE the millage rate, if they do …..not knowing how many attorney hours and $$$$$ they will need to fight on against Anderson! Commissioner Bankson and Commissioner Dean voted correctly on this one! Reply Now after reading Apopka Then and Now Facebook the community divisions are already firing up…….this was a bad decision not to settle. I am also reading Sammy’s comments that HE paid RA……how much???? $365,000, say what????? LOL….wow, all along I thought it was the city paying Richard instead of Sammy……Wow how much stranger are things going to get in this city? You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Mama Mia July 20, 2017 at 9:30 am Mama Mia Oh, and the only old police cars I have seen around these parts are the police cars up at Zellwood at the auction surplus sale……… Anybody understand why OJ is coming to Florida to live because he is protected against debtors and exactly how that works? Hope to heck he doesn’t come to Apopka, cause that is all we need! And here is the best part of all……it did not even have to be council approved!last_img read more

Apopka police arrest daycare worker for cruelty to a child

first_img Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! TAGSApopka Police Department Previous articleIt is Official: Apopka’s CRA puts profit over peopleNext articleAAA urges motorists to be alert when schools are open Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000  The Apopka Police Department arrested a local daycare worker yesterday for striking a 4-year-old child on the arm with a ruler.Janet Gainer, 54 of Apopka, was arrested on Thursday and charged with cruelty towards a child and transported to the Orange County Jail. Gainer is employed by The Learning Tree Academy in Apopka.On Tuesday, the APD responded jointly with the Department of Children and Families to investigate the allegation of the 4-year-old being struck twice on the upper arm with a ruler while in Gainer’s care at the daycare. Through interviews and physical evidence it was determined the child was in fact hit with a ruler by Gainer.On Wednesday, a Child Protection Team concluded that the child was a victim of physical abuse. According to their report, the bruises, square shape, and measuring 4×2 cm were consistent with marks left from a ruler.According to the APD arrest report, Gainer denied hitting the child with a ruler, but did admit to “popping” her on the hand because the child was hitting other children.According to The Learning Tree Academy’s parent handbook, physical punishment is not allowed on the premises by staff or any other person. Gainer has been employed by the school since 2016 as a teacher assistant. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name herelast_img read more

Updating: New dates set for New Errol project hearings

first_img Please enter your comment! TAGSCity of ApopkaNew Errol Project Previous articleBreaking News: 17-year-old shot in South ApopkaNext articleThe Apopka Voice Townhall set for Seats #1 and #2 Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Updating Breaking News from last week:Planning Commission and City Council meetings scheduled for March/AprilDevelopment plans for the proposed New Errol project will be reviewed at a special Apopka Planning Commission meeting at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 20, at the Apopka Community Center, 519 S. Central Ave. Special City Council meetings are scheduled for 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 27, and 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 11, at the Apopka Community Center.Last week the City of Apopka canceled the meetings scheduled for February 20th (Planning Commission) and February 27th (City Council). Signature H Property Group, the developers of the New Errol project, presented their massive undertaking to the Apopka City Council in August of 2017. The project, which would completely transform Errol Estate, includes:A redesigned championship golf courseA 15,000 square foot clubhouse with restaurantA boutique lodge hotelA two-acre water parkOutdoor parks and trails264 new residencesA resort-like Adult Living FacilityIt was also learned in the August meeting that the project would cost $150-million to construct in total and that the 10-year projection for the project is expected to net $121 million.The City Council voted 4-1 to approve the Ordinance (2581) on first reading, which moved the project to a state review. In December, the state approved the project, which brought the project back to the City of Apopka for final approval. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Please enter your name here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

The merits of yoga to deal with low back pain

first_img I learned that yoga helps with back pain. I will certainly give it a try. Focus on your healthFrom Florida Hospital ApopkaIf you’re like millions of people in the world, then you probably suffer or have suffered, from lower back pain (LBP) at some point. On top of being uncomfortable for the patient, LBP is the costliest work disability in the United States, and it can lead to missed work, depression, restless sleep and debt due to treatment costs. Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate July 17, 2017 at 1:03 am Soul-ga with Michelle offers yoga classes for ALL health types. Join her for a class that will leave you feeling de-stressed, stretched & completely relaxed! #: 407.404.4476 or by e-mail at [email protected] Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 July 18, 2017 at 2:34 pm Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter August 1, 2017 at 8:43 pm The Anatomy of Fear Reply July 18, 2017 at 12:52 pm You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Dr. Chetan Patel, an orthopedic surgeon at Florida Hospital, believes in not only finding the cause of back pain but also improving the way that modern medicine treats spinal conditions, such as introducing alternative treatments to existing treatment plans. In pursuit of this goal, Dr. Patel recently partnered with other medical specialists to systematically review the results of a number of randomized, controlled trials where yoga was used as a method for treating patients with LBP. They were able to conclude that overall, yoga intervention can significantly improve a patient’s quality of life with the added potential to reduce stress, depression, medication usage and the likelihood of disability.As with any form of exercise, it is important to talk to your doctor about specific postures that are best for your condition. Here are a few ways that you can incorporate basic aspects of yoga into your everyday lifestyle:1. Start and end each day with stretching.The physical part of yoga focuses on holding postures that help stretch and lengthen your muscles. Read our previous blog for a few yoga poses that will can help reduce LBP and increase your energy.2. Practice breathing.Breathing is another very important part of yoga that aims to reduce stress and anxiety and clear your mind. Controlled breathing can help relax your muscles and allow you to focus on the tasks at hand. Take the time to inhale slowly and exhale slowly through your nose for a few rounds of breath. You can turn this breathing into a meditation by closing your eyes and letting your mind wander and relax. You’ll be amazed by how rejuvenated you feel after simply slowing down and allowing oxygen to flow through your body.3.  Eat a balanced diet.The food you consume has a drastic effect on your spine health. Foods that are high in sodium, fat, and sugar can cause inflammation in the body and can result in back pain and injury. Watch our SpineU video for a few ways that you can incorporate healthy habits into your everyday lifestyle.The goal of yoga in healthcare – similar to Florida Hospital’s own philosophy of care – is to heal and strengthen the mind, body, and spirit. Partnered with regular supervision from your doctor, yoga can help release the tense muscles that are causing back pain, while strengthening and lengthening your muscles to prevent future injuries from occurring. By combining these postures with a diet that has a high concentration of foods with anti-inflammatory properties and practicing breathing techniques to help you relax and de-stress, you will be well on your way to a pain-free, lower-stress lifestyle. Since this article is about yoga, there was a yoga instructor, a beautiful lady who was going to marry her fiancé next month, and she was from Australia, and was living in the upscale home of her fiancé while he was away, during the night, she heard what see believed to be a sexual assault in the alleyway behind their home, and called 911, and went out to the police cruiser to talk to the police officer, who had another officer with him in the passenger seat. She was in her pajamas and was talking to the officer that had driven and the other passenger officer pulled a gun out and shot her through the driver’s window, and shot her dead! This was in Minneapolis, Minn…..she was a yoga instructor, mediation instructor, life and health coach, and had attended a university to study to be an animal vet. There are cops out of control all across our nation and they are giving the good cops bad names…..they didn’t have their body cameras on as they were suppose to, nor the car cameras, and have not responded as to why they shot her. Everyone that knew her said she was a calm, peaceful person, not one to confront, but one to help people. This happened recently, and it is a sad day here in our nation, the way the US is becoming. Mama Mia Please enter your name here Michelle Kalkan Please enter your comment! Ouch. 4 COMMENTS Reply Reply Mama Mia Kate Reply TAGSFlorida Hospital – ApopkaFocus on your healthyoga Previous articleIn case you missed it: The Apopka news week in reviewNext articleTarget drops two popular Brands Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Apopka named Healthy Community Champion

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Gerard Curci The Orange County communities of Apopka, Eatonville, and Orlando were among 46 that were recently named Healthy Community Champions by the Florida Department of Health.“I am pleased to recognize local communities who have shown a special commitment to improving the health of their residents,” said State Surgeon General and Secretary Dr. Celeste Philip. “Their efforts to implement policies that empower residents and visitors to improve their health are an important part of creating healthy environments throughout Florida.”“Apopka, Eatonville, and Orlando are leading the way in Orange County by creating a ‘health in all policies’ approach for their residents,” said Dr. Kevin Sherin, the Health Officer for the Florida Department of Health in Orange County. “By promoting healthy lifestyles and conditions for health they are adding value to the community and to Orange County. We are delighted to see them recognized by the State Surgeon General for their efforts.”Each in their own way, whether through healthy cooking classes, food nutrition education, or fitness programs, the local governments of Apopka, Eatonville, and Orlando have played an important role in improving the health of their communities.Local governments have implemented a variety of policies that have been shown to increase physical activity and improve nutrition. Between February and April 2018, local governments were invited to submit best practices to demonstrate how they met the Healthy Community Champion criteria.The Healthy Community Champions Recognition Program provides an opportunity to highlight local governments that have focused on improving the built environment. The department defines the Built Environment as the places where people live, work and play (e.g., homes, buildings, streets, open spaces and infrastructure), food environments (e.g., supermarkets, corner stores, farmer’s markets and food pantries), and other environmental influences (e.g., indoor/outdoor air and water quality, noise pollution and environmental toxins).The built environment can influence residents’ physical, nutritional, and mental health within their community through policies designed to provide adequate access to physical activity opportunities, adequate access to healthy, affordable, and culturally appropriate foods, access to health care and a reduction or elimination of environmental health risks to the community. Through communities working to implement policies within the built environment, a greater level of social connectedness can be experienced. As defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, social connectedness is achieved through strong formal relationships between organizations and support services designed to help better ensure that services are delivered and promote a person’s sense of well-being. The Anatomy of Fear Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. 1 COMMENT TAGSHealthy Community Champion Previous articleHurricane Florence targets CarolinasNext articleUpdating Breaking News: Apopka man dies in house fire Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name here Have any of these people been to the Apopka Walmart?center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! September 12, 2018 at 11:40 am You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Reply last_img read more

2019 ‘Behind-the-Wheel Confessions’ Report Reveals Startling Statistics

first_img Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Study: 71% of Drivers Admit to Drowsy Driving,24% Admit to Drunk Driving and 40% Admit to Road RageFrom DriversEd.comIn recognition of National Safety Month, which takes place in June, DriversEd.com, the leading online driving school, today released the survey results from its 2019 Behind-the-Wheel Confessions Report. The study reveals striking statistics on an array of dangerous behind-the-wheel behaviors that U.S. drivers admit to—from distracted driving, drunk driving and drowsy driving to speeding, running through red lights and not stopping at stop signs.“The good news is that a fairly high percentage, 91%, of Americans say they always wear a seatbelt. The bad news: just about all of the other data we found,” said Laura Adams, safety and education analyst at DriversEd.com. “When it comes to driving safety, the country and its roadways are in a state of perennial crisis—and the situation is getting worse, largely thanks to phones, texting, and social media.”“One of the most alarming figures we found is that one in every five U.S. drivers admits to falling asleep at the wheel,” said Adams. “The solution in most cases is simply getting proper sleep and always being aware of the medications you’re taking, how they interact and their potential side effects.”Among the hazardous behaviors that U.S. drivers confessed to:Drowsy Driving: 71% admit they have driven while drowsy, while 20% admit they have fallen asleep.Speeding: 89% admit they have driven above the speed limit.Road Rage: 40% admit they have had road rage.Stop Signs: 58% admit they have gone through a stop sign without entirely stopping.Red Lights: 47% admit they have run a red light.Changing Tires: 62% admit they have waited longer than they should have to change their tires.Distracted Driving: 31% admit they check their phone more often than they should while driving.Drunk Driving: 24% admit they have driven while drunk.In addition, on the topic of driving safety, the study found:Driver vs. Passenger: 78% of Americans say they feel safer as a driver, while 22% say they feel safer as a passenger.Self-Driving Cars vs. Human-Operated Cars: 57% of Americans say that, in ten years, human-operated cars will be safer, while 43% say self-driving cars.Drunk Driving vs. Marijuana Driving: 36% of Americans say driving while drunk is more dangerous, while 3% say driving while high from marijuana and 61% say both are equally dangerous.“For each and every one of these hazardous behind-the-wheel behaviors, there are solutions—from checking your eyesight and hearing to assigning a designated driver to set calendar reminders to inspect your tires to meditating before driving to simply exercising self-discipline,” added Adams.The full Behind-the-Wheel Confessions report—which includes additional data, insights and analysis—is available at driversed.com/trending/study-drivers-behind-wheel-confessions-reveal-dangerous-habits.This report is a follow-up to DriversEd.com’s April-released Cannabis and Cars Report, which found that 21% of drivers admit to driving while high from marijuana, and March-released Distracted Driving and Social Media Report, which found that 55% of drivers admit to checking social media while driving.MethodologyThe 2019 Behind-the-Wheel Confessions survey was conducted online using Survey Monkey. One thousand and forty-seven participants were polled, spanning across the United States, with the U.S. driving population represented by the 957 respondents who, before completing the survey, answered that they have a driver’s license. The demographics of those polled represented a broad range of household income, geographic location, age, and gender.About DriversEd.comDriversEd.com is the #1 online driving school—with courses offered directly, through partners and through some of the largest schools in the country. As the industry leader in teaching defensive driving, DriversEd.com is the premier destination for online driver education, and the go-to resource for driving safety-related tips, news and strategies. The site offers comprehensive solutions, including online driver’s education, in-car driving lessons, traffic school, insurance, telematics and more. DriversEd.com’s tools are geared towards developing safe, confident drivers well-prepared for a lifetime of safe driving. Visit the DriversEd.com website, and connect with DriversEd.com on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here TAGSDriversEd.com Previous articleAmendment 4: Let’s Talk About ItNext articleOrange County market value reaches historic high  Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The Anatomy of Fear LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name here Please enter your comment! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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