Concerns over Fukuoka pitch at Rugby World Cup

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSSkip AdAds by Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. This pitch is cutting up horribly – even for a rugby match! #FRAUSA #RWC2019— Stewart Ashmore (@Ashy10) October 2, 2019 Concerns over Fukuoka pitch at Rugby World CupDuring its first outing at the Rugby World Cup, for Italy’s win over Canada, Fukuoka Hakatanomori Stadium’s pitch wasn’t holding up. Then during France 33-9 USA the turf was ripping up again.With Ireland versus Samoa coming up in Fukuoka at 11.45am on Saturday 12 October, concerns are starting to be raised about whether the field will hold up for such an important match.For the second game there, the ground staff had to replace a 12m strip of turf. But the pitch was in a  bad way in that first game, for Italy and Canada, and people definitely noticed…center_img The turf tore up in the first two games at the Fukuoka Hakatanomori Stadium – and Ireland v Samoa is yet to come there Related: A guide to the Rugby World Cup venuesRugby World Cup say of the ground in their official guide: “Surrounded by green, verdant forest and on the very doorstep of the wonderfully cosmopolitan yet laidback southern city of Fukuoka, Fukuoka Hakatanomori Stadium will be an incredible venue from which to enjoy some cracking Rugby World Cup 2019 action. Being a compact and intimate venue and a purpose-built rectangular stadium, fans will enjoy being close to the on-field action, and close to the city of Fukuoka in order to enjoy the pre and post-match atmosphere back in town.”Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features.Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links. However, as the game wore on, the wear and tear was noticeable all over the park. At set-piece time, and even in open play, dirt was sent flying and some players lost their footing on the run.Spraying dirt: the Eagles attempt to tackle Sofiane Guitoune of France (Getty Images)After the match ended with a bonus-point win for France, some of the players were asked about the surface. USA hooker Dylan Fawsitt was pragmatic, saying: “Facilities in Japan have just been phenomenal, so I won’t say a bad word about any of it. It was a bit choppy on the pitch but it’s not something that affected the play in the game. I thought the standard of rugby today was quite high.”However, France prop Cyril Baille was not so magnanimous, saying: “It was very tough, very difficult. When scrummaging the ground would come up, it wasn’t firm, and it was hard when trying to push.”Uneven footing: USA wing Martin Iosefo kicks (Getty Images)Eyes now turn to the next fixture in Fukuoka, with two physical sides in Ireland and Samoa set to do battle in the ultra-competitive Pool A. As you can see, plenty of others are concerned about the state of that pitch.last_img read more

Five things we learnt from the European semi-finals

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. No ordinary Joe: Exeter’s Joe Simmonds scores against Toulouse in the Champions Cup semi-final (Getty) 3. Simmonds brothers stake their claimsWho is England’s third-best fly-half? Exeter fans will tell you it’s one of Owen Farrell or George Ford until the cows come home. Joe Simmonds, they say, should play for England.Captain of the season’s dominant team at 23, the possessor of one of the best dummies in England, a dead-eyed goalkicker – he’s pushed ahead of the pack in the quest to be England’s next cab off the rank.England class: the Simmonds brothers celebrate the try that put the lid on Exeter’s semi-final win (Getty)Possibly more of a game-manager last season behind a ferocious Exeter pack, the Exeter pack is, well, still ferocious, but Simmonds has taken the next step towards talismanic status. Aided by a half-back partnership with Jack Maunder which has flourished since their teenage years, Simmonds’s try was rich rewards for an impeccable vein of form this season.Comfortably receiving the ball the least of any starting stand-off last weekend, Exeter used him as something of a key – the smooth touch when breaking down the front door was taking just a little too long. Even if he doesn’t make a match-day 23, he’s surely a player to get in camp before England’s Autumn Nations campaign.And what of his brother Sam, so unlucky not to have added to his seven England caps from 2017-18. He may have scored a first-half try, meaning he’s scored more European tries in a single season than any other forward, but his most important intervention came with a brilliant try-saving tackle on Alban Placines. He’s another name in the conversation alongside Vunipola, Curry and Dombrandt.4. Harry Randall stars in England No 9 watchMax Malins has been mentioned in dispatches, but it could be argued that Bristol’s key man on Friday night was scrum-half Harry Randall. There are possibly even two spaces for a scrum-half in Eddie Jones’s autumn squad up for grabs – and a squall of potential candidates.Small wonder: Bristol scrum-half Harry Randall enhanced his England claims against Bordeaux (Getty)So what a piece of timing it was for Randall to have his best game since the restart, the highlight reel moment an ingenious grubber through to the onrushing Malins. One criticism of Randall has been his box-kicking, but Luke Morahan had a field day with his scrum-half’s bombs from the base.Jones loves a scrum-half with the tempo of Randall, and on form like this England would do well to pick him – Wales are sniffing around for the Llandovery College product.5. Liability Lavanini hurts Leicester againTomás Lavanini delivered possibly the most Tomás Lavanini of performances against Toulon on Saturday night. An outstanding physical presence, a canny lineout operator – before a sloppy yellow card undid all his good work. Who won the sweepstakes this week?Some Leicester fans have claimed Lavanini’s reputation precedes him, but reputations do exist for a reason. He can have no complaints here, a late hit on the scrum-half capping off a string of indiscretions.Flawed performance: Tomas Lavanini carries in Toulon, where the Tigers lock was again carded (Getty)We’ve seen him sent off in Argentina’s key 2019 World Cup game, yellow-carded in their 2015 quarter-final, he’s the most carded Puma in history. Generally it’s a good thing when players replicate their international form for their club side – but not here.A high earner at Leicester Tigers, is it time for the men from the Midlands to cut their losses? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Morris, Malins and the magnificent Simmonds brothers – Jacob Whitehead highlights standout performances on a weekend of mixed fortunes for English clubs in Europe Five Things We Learnt from the European Semi-finalsThe home team may have won every game last weekend but there was far more of interest than that simple fact suggests, with numerous players putting their hands up for selection ahead of the Autumn Nations Cup.We’ve seen monkeys shed from backs, dynasties ending and possibly another beginning – although we’ll wait another few weeks before handing over the crown. Plus, we got 100 minutes of Semi Radradra, meaning the weekend’s excitement was used up by ten o’clock on Friday night. But what have the weekend’s results taught us – if anything?1. Racing can win big gamesDeontay Wilder delivered a brilliant piece of trash-talk before his 2018 meeting with Luis Ortiz, claiming: “You have to be perfect for 12 rounds. I only need to be perfect for two seconds and then, in the blink of an eye, it’s bam, baby, goodnight!”Juan Imhoff’s late winner, delivered on a silver platter by bad-boy butlers Finn Russell and Virimi Vakatawa, was the rugby equivalent of Wilder’s famous right hand. A perfect Saracens defensive performance for 75 minutes seemed to have delivered them to a fourth final in five years, but momentary perfection from the Racing back-line sent that to the canvas.Too hot to handle: Virimi Vakatawa escapes the clutches of Elliot Daly during Racing’s win (Getty)Racing 92 were in danger of becoming like domestic rivals Clermont Auvergne, with only a solitary Top 14 title to show for a period of recent dominance.Their record in Europe over the last four years reads losing finalists, bottom of the group, losing finalists, losing quarter-finalists. But whereas recent years have seen them lose close European games – see 22-21 to Toulouse last year, 15-12 to Leinster the season before that – they may have finally summited the hump with last weekend’s tight win.However, next month, can they climb the mountain?2. Sarries young guns are going to be just fineIf the surprise package of the quarter-finals was 19-year-old Northampton loosehead Manny Iyogun, Saturday’s equivalent was Saracens centre Dom Morris. The academy graduate only made his European debut in the last moments of the previous week’s victory in Leinster, but was pressed into action after just 12 minutes in Paris.Jogging onto the pitch as a replacement for the stricken Duncan Taylor, he set up for the resulting lineout and looked at his opposite number. Virimi Vakatawa. Gulp.Sudden impact: Saracens’ Dom Morris is tackled by Simon Zebo and Antonie Claassen in Paris (Inpho)But Morris was superb, reading the play superbly as the designated blitzer in Saracens’ defensive scheme, with Imhoff’s winning try only coming when Morris was stuck on the floor from a previous phase. It’s testament to Morris’s quality that his curly lid was nearly indistinguishable from Taylor’s mop in a relief performance of real bravura.His break with 20 minutes left could have been one of the great knockout scores, but will instead be slotted into the Mathew Tait 2007 file.Those Saracens fans who tucked into Friday night’s aperitif of Bristol v Bordeaux can take some solace in the star turn of loanee Max Malins. He had a couple of teething problems in the first half, but Matthieu Jalibert will break many a full-back’s ankles in the years to come.Malins’s second-half and extra-time performance was something to behold, with his offload in the first minute of the added period the match-winning moment. Oh, and he’d profit from Radradra’s speedy wrists to put the final flourish on the score-line, and bag himself a double.last_img read more

Washington National Cathedral embraces Creation Care Year

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Advocacy Peace & Justice, Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tags In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Washington National Cathedral embraces Creation Care Year Sleeth challenges unthical animal practices in St. Francis Day sermon Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ [Episcopal News Service, Washington, D.C.] Blessed Earth founder Dr. Matthew Sleeth kicked off a Creation Care series at Washington National Cathedral on Oct. 7 with a St. Francis’ Day sermon on caring for animals, reminding participants that not one sparrow falls from the sky without God noticing.Describing the manger scene of Christ’s nativity, Sleeth said this “pretty much depicted the way humans interacted with agriculture for 2,000 years,” yet has little relation to the way we raise animals today.“This has nothing to do with animals held in cages, not able to turn around, not seeing the light of day, and fed other animals, even if they’re vegetarian,” he said, noting that unethical practices “can be hidden from you and me but not from the Lord God. He started life with cows and sheep.”“Our food has no life,” said Joel Salatin, farmer and author of Folks, This Ain’t Normal, decrying the use of harmful chemicals in agriculture at a forum preceding the service. “If it can’t die it has no life, and it can’t give us life.”In an effort to shed light on these and other environmental issues, Creation Care Year – a partnership between Washington National Cathedral and Blessed Earth, an educational nonprofit that inspires and equips people of faith to become better stewards of the earth – was launched in April with an Earth Day call to action from Sleeth, who left his position as an Emergency Room director to lecture, write and preach about creation care.Supported, in part, by a grant from the Kendeda Fund, the program aims to mobilize church leadership by focusing on key pulpits that have far-reaching impact. It will include sermons, forums, small group studies, lectures and classes on a wide range of topics, from food to farming and sustainable energy, delivered by experts such as Norman Wirzba, research professor of theology, ecology and rural life at Duke Divinity School, and organizations such as Greater Washington Interfaith Power and Light.“The focus is on raising up awareness as well as highlighting established efforts,” said the Rev. Lyndon Shakespeare, the cathedral’s director of program and ministry, adding that a thematic program of this breadth is a new approach for the cathedral.“It allows us the space and time to settle into one topic,” he said, noting that it also enables the cathedral to serve as a resource for the Episcopal Diocese of Washington. “You can come here, take a class and then take this back to your parish.”The cathedral hopes to develop a book out of some of the lectures, as well as get people connected with organizations already involved in this work, he said.“A lot of these issues are interconnected,” said Laura Leavell, of Blessed Earth.But in many congregations, she said, the environment has been seen as a political and divisive issue, making it easy for many to dismiss. By reminding Christians of the biblical mandate to care for creation, and by coming at it from many different angles, Blessed Earth hopes that more people will tune back in.“Christians will listen to scripture,” she said. “They respect the Bible.”In his sermon, Sleeth offered three key points on what the Bible say about animals: Man is called to name the animals (Adam and Eve), rescue the animals (Noah) and be kind to the animals (Rebecca), he said. It was Rebecca’s kindness to animals – she offered Abraham’s servant Eliezer a drink and then watered his camels – that spoke to her good character and led to her betrothal to Isaac, Abraham’s son, in Genesis 24.“To know these themes, and to decry their trespass, is the job of the church,” Sleeth said.Animals are with Jesus at his birth, following his temptation, and on his final journey into Jerusalem, when he rides a horse that has never been ridden, he added.“Regardless of whether it’s Rebecca watering camels, St. Francis preaching to birds, William Wilberforce rescuing horses or C.S. Lewis refusing to set a mousetrap … saints are kind to animals,” he said.Referencing what the Bible says of those who are cruel to animals, Sleeth quoted Genesis 49:5 and the harsh words meted out to the violent brothers, Simeon and Levi: “Let me not enter their council, let me not join their assembly, for they have killed men in their anger and hamstrung oxen as they pleased. Cursed be their anger, so fierce, and their fury, so cruel! I will scatter them in Jacob and disperse them in Israel.”Sleeth said the Bible also includes an important caveat about animals: Do not worship them.“In ancient times, one could easily value a horse more than God,” he said. Animals were worshiped as deities in some cultures or lionized like Bucephalus, Alexander the Great’s legendary horse.“Is getting a kidney transplant for your cat or dog wrong when people in the world are going hungry? I can’t say where the line between idol and pet is drawn,” he said. “But if you seek the Bible’s wisdom on such matters, consider this: In all the thousands of pages of the Bible and all the thousands of years they represent, not one horse is named and not one horse race occurs.”As it unfolds between now and Earth Day 2013, when Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori will offer the culminating sermon, the Creation Care program will suggest many ways for participants to take action. In closing, Sleeth offered just one.“Americans decide what kind of farms they want, what kind of world they want concerning farmers and food supply sources three times a day, when they sit down to eat,” he said. While he stopped short of advocating vegetarianism, he said it was “essential to not eat meat that was grown or raised or produced in a way that is incompatible with Christ.”“You picture Christ as a baby,” he said. “If the feeding operation doesn’t add up to some place that you would put him, don’t eat the food.”A complete list of Creation Care Year programs is available here.— Lucy Chumbley is a freelance journalist based in Washington, D.C. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Environment & Climate Change Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI By Lucy ChumbleyPosted Oct 11, 2012 last_img read more

Miembros episcopales del CCA comentan sobre una reunión ‘amigable’

first_imgMiembros episcopales del CCA comentan sobre una reunión ‘amigable’ La reunión de Nueva Zelanda fue un ‘lugar de diálogo profundo’ y de atender al evangelio Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York La Iglesia Episcopal estuvo representada en el CCA-15 por (de izquierda a derecha) la Rda. Gay Jennings, de Ohio, la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori; Josephine Hicks, de Carolina del Norte y el obispo Ian Douglas de Connecticut. Ellos aparecen aquí en su foto oficial con el arzobispo de Cantórbery Rowan Williams (al centro) frente a la iglesia de Santa María en los terrenos de la catedral de la Santa Trinidad en Auckland. Foto de Anglican Communion News Service[Episcopal News Service – Auckland, Nueva Zelanda] la 15ª. reunión del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano que concluyó aquí el 7 de noviembre (hora local) luego de sesionar durante 12 días, resultó “notable” según los cuatro miembros del Consejo que pertenecen a la Iglesia Episcopal.La Iglesia Episcopal estuvo representada en la reunión por la Rda. Gay Jennings, de Ohio; Josephine Hicks, de Carolina del Norte y el obispo Ian Douglas, de Connecticut.La obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori asistió a la reunión en su calidad de miembro del Comité Permanente de la Comunión Anglicana, que se reunió aquí antes de que comenzara a sesionar el CCA. Douglas también es miembro del Comité Permanente.Hicks, cuyo período expiró al final de esta reunión, es el miembro que ha servido por más tiempo [en este organismo], aunque Douglas ha estado presente en cuatro reuniones del CCA en diversas funciones. El período de Hicks comenzó con la reunión de 2005 en Nottingham, Inglaterra, cuando los miembros de la Iglesia Episcopal de EE.UU. y de la Iglesia Anglicana del Canadá asistieron como observadores después de que ambas provincias retiraran voluntariamente su participación en consonancia con una petición de los primados —o principales arzobispos— anglicanos para darle espacio a la consideración de asuntos relacionados con la sexualidad.Esa primera reunión, le dijo ella a Episcopal News Service durante una entrevista con los cuatro representantes de la Iglesia Episcopal antes de que terminara la reunión de Auckland, fue “extremadamente tensa y embarazosa, aunque tuvo sus momentos maravillosos”.La reunión de 2009 en Jamaica fue “mucho más relajada, en una atmósfera mucho mejor, pero aún con un trasfondo contencioso que a veces se hacía más ostensible en asuntos verdaderamente difíciles”, tales como el Pacto Anglicano, el Informe Windsor 2004 y la moratoria sobre la autorización de bendiciones a parejas del mismo sexo, las consagraciones de obispos que viven en relaciones [de pareja] con personas del mismo sexo, y en las intervenciones transfronterizas de los obispos.“Esta reunión se ha sentido muy diferente e incluso más relajada, incluso menos contencioso, hasta con una mayor capacidad de congeniar”, dijo Hicks. “Todos los que estuvieron en Jamaica han comentado que esta reunión ha sido más amigable, más positiva [con] personas claramente comprometidas con la Comunión Anglicana, independientemente de sus posiciones sobre el pacto o sobre cualquier otro asunto”.Douglas convino con Hicks. “Sin duda esta reunión del CCA ha sido la más conversacional, la menos politizada”, afirmó, llamando a la reunión, que sesionó fundamentalmente en la catedral de la Santa Trinidad en Auckland, “un lugar de diálogo profundo de una manera que yo nunca lo había experimentado en el pasado”.“Hallé que hemos podido profundizar mucho en torno a la manera en que nuestras iglesias difieren unas de otras y también en lo que nos une como la Comunión misma”, dijo él. “Parece que un montón de resentimientos viejos y divisiones —de diferencias— siguen estando ahí, yo no quiero ocultarlas, pero en cuanto a las pasadas tensiones, no estoy experimentándolas en esta reunión”.La obispa primada dijo que en comparación con las primeras dos reuniones de los primados a que ella asistiera en 2007 y 2009 y la Conferencia de Lambeth que medió entre ellas, está segunda reunión del CCA a la que ella asiste “es probablemente la reunión de la Comunión Anglicana que ha demostrado más posibilidades para fomentar relaciones duraderas que yo haya visto”.Añadió que la última Reunión de los Primados en enero de 2011 “recorrió un largo trayecto en esa dirección, pero esta reunión del CCA está profundamente reconciliada con nuestra diversidad”.“Da testimonio de [un] compromiso con un cometido a largo plazo de la Comunión, en el sentido de que las personas participan y están interesadas en hacer que las cosas funcionen en nuestros variados contextos”, dijo Jefferts Schori.Por ejemplo, agregó, el CCA se comprometió a “hacerse cargo” de las redes oficiales de la Comunión entre una y otra reunión.Para Jennings, que asiste a su primera reunión del CCA resultó “una estupenda oportunidad de hacer relaciones, de aprender más acerca de las diversas provincias”.“Hemos dialogado respecto al hecho de que el CCA es el único instrumento que tiene representación de obispos, presbíteros, diáconos y laicos”, señaló ella. “Se ha hecho un llamado a que haya más laicos que formen parte del CCA y ha habido conversaciones en cuanto a la manera en que eso podría facilitarse”.Los que asistieron al CCA-15 que no forman parte de ninguno de los otros instrumentos de la Comunión “consideran que es un gran privilegio estar representando a su provincia y hay muchísimo interés en ver como las diferentes provincias se asemejan, pero también cuan diferentes son, de manera que seguimos aprendiendo los unos de los otros”.Hicks resaltó también el cambio de rumbo en el interés de la reunión.“Estoy encantada de decir que los temas que suscitaron la mayor energía y pasión en esta reunión fueron… los temas de paz y justicia a los que debemos dedicar nuestro tiempo y energía y en los que debemos concentrarnos”, señaló.Entre los temas, dijo Hicks, incluyeron el proyecto de la Biblia en la vida de la Iglesia, el abogar contra la persecución de los cristianos [en países] donde son minoría, el abogar contra la violencia de género y tomar medidas decisivas para prevenirla y el abogar por la preservación del medio ambiente y tomar medidas específicas para lograrlo.Douglas dijo que el lugar de la reunión fue “muy importante para el modo  de entender la unidad en todas nuestras diferencias”.La Iglesia Anglicana en Aotearoa, Nueva Zelanda y Polinesia es una provincia “que se ha esforzado durante décadas para lograr que las tres tradiciones, los tres grupos culturales conocidos como tikangas, vivan juntos en la plenitud de lo que Dios se propone [hacer] en estas tierras”.Se puede encontrar más información sobre esa labor aquí.Douglas agregó que él había llegado a saber que para la provincia “había sido una dura lucha aprender a vivir juntos en la plenitud del cuerpo de Cristo”.“Creo que justamente estar aquí, escuchando los distintos idiomas, viendo a las diferentes personas en la totalidad de quienes son y en la constante y ardua tarea de aunar esfuerzos ha sido un entorno o una base muy importante para todas nuestras conversaciones: casi como un microcosmos de mayores posibilidades y desafíos en la más amplia Comunión Anglicana”.Jennings también hizo hincapié en los esfuerzos de la Comunión en profundizar su unidad en medio de la diversidad.“Lo que me ha impresionado en esta reunión es que a través de las provincias parece haber alguna comprensión —no sólo de parte de los [que venimos] de América del Norte, sino a través de toda la Comunión Anglicana—  de que nuestra unidad no está basada en una creencia o en una tradición uniformes; sino, más bien, que nuestra unidad está en Jesucristo y en las cosas que consideramos esenciales para definirnos a nosotros mismos como anglicanos”, dijo ella. “Esta reunión, al menos para esta novata, parece estar mucho más interesada, como dijo Josephine, en los problemas de nuestra vida común y de cómo podemos llevar a cabo juntos la misión de Dios y buscar la paz”.Según Jefferts Schori, los miembros del CCA tuvieron “un diálogo notablemente creativo y profundo en torno a una variedad de asuntos que todos compartimos”.“Esta reunión nos ha ofrecido la capacidad de aprender de las diferencias que caracterizan a la Comunión”, afirmó ella. “Las iglesias occidentales han hablado acerca de las dificultades de retener o de atraer a jóvenes y de facilitar su liderazgo en la Iglesia y no simplemente de reducir el liderazgo a los miembros más viejos en períodos de mayor duración. Son realidades que se aplican en Papúa Nueva Guinea como en Aotearoa, Nueva Zelanda y Polinesia, en Estados Unidos, en las partes más antiguas de la Iglesia”.“Las partes más nuevas de la Iglesia que están creciendo con gran rapidez se enfrentan con problemas de recursos esenciales, con los cuales se enfrentan algunas de nuestras congregaciones rurales, de manera que tenemos cosas que aprender de las variaciones en nuestros contextos que todas se reducen a cómo presentar el evangelio de una manera que sea atractiva y restauradora para el pueblo que somos, dispuesto a proclamar  las buenas nuevas de Jesús”.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH November 10, 2012 at 12:33 pm Hermosa Foto del primado Con Obispos de ECUSA que tantas veces fueron y son de bendición para tantas iglesias. Dios los guie y bendiga a los Obispos, Presbíteros, Diáconos y Laicos de la Comunión Anglicana Episcopal! Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 9, 2012 Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rev. Grovert David Antezana Alurralde says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. Comments (1) Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

Prayers and solidarity offered after deadly attacks in Paris

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Posted Nov 14, 2015 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Comments are closed. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest November 17, 2015 at 6:56 pm May we include in our prayers all those victims of attacks in Baghdad, Beirut, and too many other places that do not make our headlines. Janet Jones says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (1) Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Bataclan Theatre in Paris, scene of one of the Nov. 13 deadly terror attacks, pictured here in 2008. Photo: Wikimedia[Anglican Communion News Service] Church leaders around the world have offered prayers and messages of solidarity after the series of terrorist attacks in Paris last night which left at least 127 people dead and many more fighting for their lives.“I am deeply shocked by the terrible tragedy which has befallen the city of Paris,” the head of the Church of England’s Diocese in Europe, the Rt .Rev. Robert Innes, Bishop of Gibraltar in Europe, said. “I offer my fervent prayers for the families who have so brutally and suddenly lost loved ones, and for all who are struggling with serious injury.“As a diocese we want to express our solidarity with the people of France at this dark time. Acts of terror against innocent people are totally abhorrent. We pray for deliverance from evil and that all the perpetrators and their accomplices are swiftly brought to justice.”In a message to the two Church of England churches in Central Paris – St. George’s in Rue Auguste-Vacquerie and St. Michael’s in Rue D’Aguesseau – the Suffragan Bishop in Europe, the Rt. Rev. David Hamid, said: “Once again violence and terrorism have struck France and the world is in shock. The numbers of dead and injured in the attacks across Paris must make this one of the deadliest of such crimes.“Across the diocese this weekend we will be praying for the people of Paris at this time of national mourning, distress and fear. We pray for all who have died that our Loving God will welcome them into his arms. We pray that God will comfort all who grieve, as well as the injured and the fearful.“And we pray that terrorism may be overcome and violent hearts turned to paths of peace.“In the face of hatred we pray that we may show forth love, and in this time of despair we remember our calling to be lights in a darkened world. May the peace of the Lord be with you.”The Cathedral of the Holy Trinity in Paris, part of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe, was closed on Saturday due to the attacks and as a result had to cancel its Junior Guild Christmas Fair; but officials said that Sunday’s services would take place as usual, with a smaller Christmas Fair taking pace after its 11 a.m. service.“Please come. We need to be together and to pray together,” the Very Rev. Lucinda Laird, dean of the cathedral, said. “Please keep our cathedral community and the city of Paris in your prayers – especially the victims and their families. Most of all, pray for peace.”And, as the Paris attacks were unfolding and the extent of the carnage became known, Convocation Bishop Pierre Whalon took to Twitter (@bppwhalon) and Facebook to update followers and to call for prayer. In a early tweet he wrote, “Je prie pour notre ville, les victimes, les forces de l’ordre, et nos ennemis. Rejoignez-moi: Seigneur, prend pitié.” (“I pray for our city, the victims, law enforcement, and our enemies. Join me: Lord, have mercy.“)Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby described hearing of the “desperate news of deep tragedy.” In a Tweet as the situation was being played out in the French capital, he spoke of the many broken hearts, and said: “We weep with those affected [and] pray for deliverance and justice.”Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, urged “all Episcopalians and people of good will and faith to pray for those who have died, those who are in harm’s way, those who seek to help in any way; and to pray for us as a human family.” In a video message, he asked people watching to join him in praying the Lord’s prayer.The Church of England has published a collection of prayers for peace on its website: “Compassionate God and Father of all, we are horrified at violence in so many parts of the world. It seems that none are safe, and some are terrified. Hold back the hands that kill and maim; turn around the hearts that hate. Grant instead your strong Spirit of Peace – peace that passes our understanding but changes lives, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”Guy Liagre, general secretary of the Conference of European Churches, said that the organization “grieves the loss of life and mourns with all those affected by this enormous tragedy. We pray for the victims, their families and friends, and for the men and women who risked their own lives last night in service to others.”He continued: “These tragic events impels CEC to strengthen our peacebuilding and reconciliation work. We must strive to follow the words of the Psalms – depart from evil, and do good; seek peace, and pursue it.”“We must continue, on the basis of our Christian faith, to uphold our values. We work towards a humane, socially conscious Europe, in which human rights and the basic values of peace, justice, freedom, tolerance, participation and solidarity prevail,” he said, citing the 2001 Charta Oecumenica.In Canada, the Council of the General Synod paused its Friday evening meeting as news of the attacks filtered through. Archbishop Fred Hiltz led prayers for those affected by the tragedy.In Australia, prayers for Paris were said every half hour at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Melbourne. “On behalf of Australia’s Anglicans, I express our deepest sympathy for and solidarity with the people of Paris in their fear, pain and mourning,” Archbishop of Melbourne Philip Freier, said. “I greatly fear that in the 21st century events like this are going to become much more common, but they will never lose their capacity to shock.“We pray for comfort for the victims, those who love them and tend them, and for those who are appalled and devastated by these vicious attacks. We pray also that calm and wise leadership will prevail, especially in the face of a possible backlash against the innocent. . .“In Australia we have never faced attacks like this, but the danger of coordinated or lone wolf attacks is increasing, as I warned in September. We have to be prepared for this reality. I commend the swift response of the authorities in Paris, which surely saved many lives, and also the endeavours of the authorities in Australia to keep us safe.”The French flag flies at half staff outside St Andrew’s Cathedral, Sydney. Photo: Russell PowellA French flag is flying at half-staff at St. Andrew’s Cathedral in Sydney, where the Prime Minister of New South Wales, Mike Baird, will attend a special prayer service for Paris on Sunday. “It is difficult to comprehend the barbarity of such attacks but we mourn with those who mourn and weep with those who weep”, the Archbishop of Sydney, Dr Glenn Davies, said.“We pray that God in his unfailing love will comfort the people of Paris, especially those who have been injured and the families and friends who have lost loved ones,” he said.The Anglican church in Lille, northern France has opened its doors today “for people to come and pray and seek the Lord’s comfort after a night of events which are horrific to try and comprehend.”— Episcopal News Service staff contributed to this story. Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Prayers and solidarity offered after deadly attacks in Paris Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN last_img read more

Encountering God in the Storm: Anglicans consult on climate justice

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ walter woodson says: Rector Tampa, FL By ACNS staffPosted Jul 5, 2016 Press Release Service Anglican Communion, Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 July 5, 2016 at 5:14 pm Excellent point, but a week in Fiji is quite a temptation and climate change is a good cover for a boondoggle Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ronald Davin says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel July 5, 2016 at 9:02 am Does this article really say that people boarded various jets around the world and polluted the skies with carbon fuel, to tell us how bad we are ? July 5, 2016 at 6:28 pm Like Divos , nothing like a good high minded vacation to discuss noble issue uses.. Why not conference video it all? Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments (4) Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Comments are closed. Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events July 5, 2016 at 7:09 pm Will any of the conference be available by video? Would love to have a link… Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Donald Heacock says: Encountering God in the Storm: Anglicans consult on climate justice Lella Lowe says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Environment & Climate Change [Anglican Communion News Service] Anglicans from around the world are gathering in Fiji this week for an international consultation on climate justice. The event, organized by the Anglican mission agency United Society, is designed to help Anglican leaders “grapple more vigorously” with the challenges of climate change.“Together, you will be exploring and struggling with difficult themes which create many challenges for the Anglican Communion and the world,” Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said in a message to the consultation’s participants. “We need to face them together and find a way forward. Then we will be able to fulfill our purpose. It is my prayer that this consultation will play a hugely significant role in defining a strategy going forward with climate justice.”The seven-day consultation, “Encountering God in the Storm,” is being held in Fiji at the invitation of the Archbishop Winston Halapua, bishop of Polynesia and one of the primates of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand & Polynesia.Some 676 of Fiji’s villages are at risk of flooding because of rising sea levels. And several communities have already been forced to relocate. “The impact is not just economic – with ocean acidification killing fish stocks and salt water ruining farmland – but cultural because ancestral lands are being destroyed,” the United Society said in a statement.“The growing intensity and frequency of storms and flooding is predicted to result in increases in drought, affecting land, food and water security. This year alone the nation has contended with Cyclone Winston and numerous earthquakes.“According to National Climate Justice: ‘Fijians are among the most vulnerable to climate change.’”The United Society’s global relations director, Rachel Parry, added: “One of the aims of the consultation is to encourage Anglican leaders worldwide to grapple more vigorously with climate justice, helping to raise the issue on political agendas and inspiring the church to help communities in devising local responses.“The consultation is also an opportunity for [the United Society] to listen to the wider concerns of our global partners, including an exploration of how we can work together as an Anglican family in our efforts to achieve the U.N.’s Sustainable Development Goals.” Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Rector Bath, NC last_img read more

Le Magazine Anglican : Les ministères des femmes dans la Communion…

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Le Magazine Anglican : Les ministères des femmes dans la Communion Anglicane. Émission d’août The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Posted Aug 15, 2016 Rector Albany, NY La cathédrale épiscopale de la Sainte Trinité à Paris est aujourd’hui un exemple de la féminisation des ministères anglicans. Au service du dimanche matin, le Doyen Lucinda Laird et la chanoine Mary Haddad accueillent et célèbrent côte à côte.Mais outre le clergé, dans les équipes liturgiques chargées de la préparation et de la célébration du service, la centaine de bénévoles est hautement féminisé.Pourtant, longtemps anecdotiques, les ministères féminins tels qu’on les connaît aujourd’hui sont le fruit de 120 ans de lutte. C’est ce qu’explique, dans le Magazine Anglican, Stéphanie Burette, paroissienne de la Cathédrale de la Sainte Trinité, actuellement séminariste à Berkeley, le séminaire épiscopal de Yale aux États-Unis.« Rien n’interdisait l’accès aux ministères, mais la coutume voulait que l’on ordonnât que des hommes », rappelle Stéphanie. C’est en 1944 que la première femme prêtre a été ordonnée dans la Communion Anglicane, une chinoise née à Hong Kong : Florence Li Tim-Oi.Son ordination suscita nombre de controverses.Depuis le XIXe siècle dans l’Église Épiscopale, l’accès des femmes aux ministères ordonnés a alimenté une histoire mouvementée, voire rocambolesque. Les premières femmes ordonnées portaient le nom de diaconesses, un statut différent de celui de diacre. Il faudra attendre les années 1970 pour que la distinction disparaisse.C’est à partir de 1977 que des femmes seront ordonnées prêtres dans l’Église Épiscopale, après un combat acharné. Jugez-en plutôt.En 1973, cinq femmes diacres se présentent à l’ordination à New York, mais l’évêque refuse d’imposer ses mains sur leurs têtes.En juillet 1974, onze femmes diacres sont ordonnées à Philadelphie par trois évêques retraités, mais l’évêque Primat réunit la Chambre des évêques qui déclare les ordinations irrégulières.En février 1975, se créée l’organisation « Women’s ordination now », pour soutenir les onze femmes de Philadelphie dont l’ordination sera régularisée par la convention Générale de 1976.C’est en 1989, que Barbara Harris sera consacrée première femme évêque de l’Église Épiscopale et dans la Communion anglicane et en 2006, Katharine Jefferts Schori, 26e évêque primat de l’Église Épiscopale.Cliquer sur le lien ci-dessous, puis sur la flèche bleue pour télécharger l’émission du 13/08/2016 ou sur la flèche dans un rond pour l’écouter.Fréquence ProtestanteLe Magazine Anglican est diffusé, le 2e samedi du mois, à l’antenne parisienne de Fréquence Protestante. Via la radio numérique, chaque émission est accessible pendant six mois, aux auditeurs francophones d’Europe, d’Amérique, d’Afrique et d’Océanie.Animé depuis 2012, par Laurence Moachon, paroissienne de la Cathédrale de la Sainte Trinité à Paris, le Magazine Anglican a pour objectif de mieux faire connaître la tradition anglicane / épiscopale. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more

Diocese of East Tennessee announces bishop slate

first_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR House of Bishops Diocese of East Tennessee announces bishop slate Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events Bishop Elections, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest [Diocese of East Tennessee] The Standing Committee of the Diocese of East Tennessee April 28 announced a slate of five nominees who will stand for election as the fifth bishop of the Episcopal Church in East Tennessee.The nominees are:The Rev. Brian Cole – Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, Lexington, KentuckyThe Rev. Hendree Harrison – St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Athens, TennesseeThe Rev. Canon Frank Logue – Diocese of GeorgiaThe Rev. Canon Lance Ousley – Diocese of Olympia and St. John’s Episcopal Church, Kirkland, WashingtonThe Rev. Marty Stebbins – St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church, Wilson, North CarolinaNominees’ biographical information and answers to a series of questions, can be found here.The Rev. Jay Mills, president of the Standing Committee, said, “It is my humble honor to be involved in the bishop search as the chair of the Standing Committee. It is truly exciting to be part of the opening of God’s choice for us for our new bishop. We are truly lucky to be a healthy, happy diocese in the midst of that search. It made us an attractive diocese, I suspect, for interested folks.”“The Search and Nominating Committee has worked hard;” said Chairman Joe Vrba, “we’ve prayed even harder and we’ve shed a few tears along the way. We’ve trusted in the Holy Spirit throughout. And, you know, everything worked out fine. Every one of us feels blessed in having been part of this process.”As allowed by the constitution and canons of the diocese, additional nominations may be put forward via the petition process for two weeks following the announcement of the slate. The petition window is now open and will close at the end of the day on May 12, 2017.As the work of the Search and Nominating Committee comes to a close, the work of the Transition Committee is already well underway, with “walkabouts” scheduled to give every person in the Diocese of East Tennessee a chance to get to know the nominees before the special electing convention in July. Additional details will be shared on the bishop search website and on all diocesan communication channels in the coming weeks.The 5th bishop of the Episcopal Church in East Tennessee will succeed the Rt. Rev. George Dibrell Young, III, who announced his retirement last April. Young has served as bishop since June 2011. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Posted Apr 28, 2017 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC last_img read more

Burundi’s faith leaders renew commitment to peace and reconciliation

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Posted Oct 20, 2017 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anglican Communion Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Burundi’s faith leaders renew commitment to peace and reconciliation Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Africa, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Advocacy Peace & Justice, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN [Anglican Communion News Service] Twelve years after Burundi’s brutal civil war, which resulted in the deaths of more than 300,000 people, the country’s faith leaders have called on the international community to “re-establish good diplomatic relationships” with their government. The call came in a communiqué signed by the Anglican primate of Burundi, Archbishop Martin Nyaboho and the bishop of Bujumbura, Eraste Bigirimana, alongside 18 other faith leaders. It was issued after two days of talks in Arusha, in neighboring Tanzania, on sustaining peace in Burundi, sponsored by the World Council of Churches and the United Nations Office on Genocide Protection and the Responsibility to Protect.Read the entire article here. Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more

Celebrations planned, tension lingers a month after marriage equality resolution…

first_img Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR General Convention 2015, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Same-Sex Marriage Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY By Mary Frances Schjonberg and David PaulsenPosted Jan 7, 2019 Human Sexuality, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing [Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Church’s five-week-old plan to give same-sex couples unfettered access to marriage in all of its domestic dioceses is still clouded by requirements not envisioned by the enabling resolution, and it has broken the relationships of some congregations with their bishops.Yet, in the midst of what more than one person has called “heartbreak,” there soon will be celebrations in some of those places. A parish in the Diocese of Central Florida is planning in February to witness the marriage of two men who have been partners for 30 years.And two of the three congregations in the Diocese of Dallas whose pastoral relationships with their bishop have changed because of their support of same-sex marriage are planning services the weekend of Jan. 19-20 to bless couples who had to leave the diocese to get married in the last three years.Eight bishops in the church’s 101 domestic dioceses previously had blocked access to the rites. Then in July, the 79th General Convention passed the often-rewritten and often-amended Resolution B012. Reactions among the eight bishops have run the gamut, from one outright refusing to comply to one making an about-face on the issue. The six other bishops are at various points in between.Bishop William Love of the Diocese of Albany has said he will not allow same-sex couples to be married by priests in that diocese. He acknowledged that he could face disciplinary proceedings by the church for refusing to obey the resolution’s requirements.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry has affirmed General Convention’s authority, saying that “those of us who have taken vows to obey the doctrine, discipline and worship of the Episcopal Church must act in ways that reflect and uphold the discernment and decisions of the General Convention of the church.” He and other church leaders, he said in mid-November, were “assessing the implications of [Love’s] statement and will make determinations about appropriate actions soon.”Of the eight bishops, only Diocese of the Virgin Islands Bishop Ambrose Gumbs has told his clergy to offer the rites without further obstacles. Gumbs previously had blocked use of the rites, which General Convention approved in 2015 (via Resolution A054).“The clergy are aware that if a same-sex couple presents themselves for pastoral care leading to marriage they are obligated to accommodate the request,” Gumbs said in an email to Episcopal News Service just after B012 took effect on the first Sunday of Advent, Dec. 2. If a priest refuses to officiate at such a wedding, the priest must “provide another priest to facilitate the process.”How the church got to this pointThe 2015 resolution said that the bishops of the church’s domestic dioceses needed to give their permission for the rites to be used. They were also told to “make provision for all couples asking to be married in this church to have access to these liturgies” even if they opposed same-sex marriage. (The Episcopal Church includes a small number of dioceses outside the United States in civil jurisdictions that do not allow marriage for same-sex couples.)The eight bishops did not authorize use of the rites in their dioceses and required couples wanting to use them to be married outside their diocese and away from their home churches. Some bishops refused to allow priests in their diocese to use the rites anywhere. This year, Resolution B012 moved the authority for deciding to use the rites from the diocesan bishop to parish priests. It said that diocesan bishops who do not agree with same-sex marriage “shall invite, as necessary,” another Episcopal Church bishop to provide “pastoral support” to the couple, the clergy member involved and the congregation. Some of the bishops have interpreted B012 as requiring – or allowing them to require – the involvement of another bishop.Christopher Hayes, who as a deputy from California proposed the amended version that convention passed, told ENS the key phrase is “as necessary.” Hayes thinks some bishops are misinterpreting that to mean necessary by mere fact of the bishops’ disagreement, whereas he understands it to mean pastorally necessary. Such pastoral necessity, he said, would be rare.“Most of the time, the bishop isn’t involved in giving pastoral support to a couple getting married,” Hayes said, adding that pastoral oversight is a different matter not addressed by the resolution.However, some of the eight bishops have argued that being involved in the use of the rites is part of their role as the diocese’s chief pastor. Tennessee Bishop John Bauerschmidt put it this way an October essay:“It is because the bishop is concerned with every marriage as chief pastor of the diocese that his or her explicit permission must be sought in the extraordinary instance of the remarriage of a person with a previous spouse still living.“Additionally, the little-noticed requirement (Canon I.18.2) that clergy who waive the 30-day notification period before officiating at any marriage must report this waiver to the bishop is a similar reminder of the bishop’s role in the everyday pastoral ministries of clergy.”B012 specifically notes that the canonical provision about remarriage after divorce (Canon I.19.3 (page 60 here)) that Bauerschmidt cites applies to same-sex couples. The resolution requires a bishop who opposes same-sex marriage to invite another bishop to consider the needed consent to remarry.Responses across the spectrumBauerschmidt said in a July letter to the diocese that B012 sets up “a particular structure that upholds the bishop’s unique role as chief pastor and teacher and presider at the liturgy,” even when the bishop cannot support same-sex marriage.Bauerschmidt said in July that he “holds the traditional teaching on marriage” so he intended to ask another bishop to provide the “pastoral care” that he said would be necessary to ensure that the trial liturgies will be available in his diocese. He told ENS in an email this week that he would wait until “sometime in January” to announce a specific implementation plan.A group of more than 100 lay and ordained Tennessee Episcopalians connected with All Sacraments for All People wrote letters to Bauerschmidt and Curry on Jan. 7 to decry the former’s refusal to institute a policy for implementing B012. They noted that at least one couple and their priest have asked Bauerschmidt for guidance and were told to wait. “Other committed couples anxiously wait to make their vows before God surrounded by the communities who love and support them,” the group told Bauerschmidt.“We therefore are reluctantly notifying you of this delay in making the trial liturgies available in this diocese,” the signers told Curry.Both letters were also sent to the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, president of the House of Deputies, and the Rev. Susan Russell, who is one of the conveners of General Convention’s Task Force on Communion Across Difference. Bauerschmidt is the other.Meanwhile, he has issued two “pastoral teaching” essays, one on the bishop’s role and one on the “church’s traditional teaching on marriage.”Florida Bishop John Howard, despite objecting to B012 at General Convention, told his diocese in August that he intended to implement the resolution. A subsequent meeting with clergy on the issue left some confusion about what that process would look like.In a Dec. 4 email to ENS, Emily Stimler, the diocese’s director of communications, said the diocese has established “a process of collaboration and transparency” for implementing the resolution as outlined here. Rectors or priests-in-charge who want to perform same-sex marriages, and their wardens, must first meet with Howard, who will “find a bishop willing to undertake pastoral oversight in accordance with the provisions of B012,” Stimler said. “The oversight would only cover marriage, and the other bishop would not take over all pastoral oversight of the congregation.”Stimler said one congregation has begun that process, though she didn’t identify the congregation or elaborate on where that process stands.Hayes told ENS he doesn’t see a need for bishop-to-clergy meetings like the ones Howard is requesting before letting the marriages proceed.“If the bishop’s theological position is ‘I can’t give support to the couple,’ what’s the purpose of the meeting?” he said.Breaking relationships over B012At least three bishops, Greg Brewer in Central Florida, Dan Martins in Springfield and George Sumner in Dallas, appear to be severing their pastoral relationships with clergy and parishes wishing to use the rites by requiring arrangements that resemble Delegated Episcopal Pastoral Oversight, or DEPO, with other Episcopal bishops, even though Resolution B012 specifically eschewed a DEPO mandate in such situations.The House of Bishops devised DEPO in 2004 for congregations that so severely disagree with their diocesan bishops on human sexuality and other theological matters that their relationships are completely broken. Not all congregations wishing to use the same-sex marriage rites are in that level of conflict with their bishop, some bishops and deputies said during the convention debate.Sumner announced in November that three congregations in his diocese intended to perform same-sex marriages: Episcopal Church of the Ascension, Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration and Episcopal Church of St. Thomas the Apostle. Missouri Bishop Wayne Smith has agreed to be “the visiting bishop” to those congregations.Sumner said he and Smith “share the hope that the three parishes will continue to invite me annually to come to preach, teach, and share in worship.”On Jan. 19, Transfiguration plans a service to renew the marriage vows of 14 same-sex couples who had to leave the diocese to get married. Retired New Hampshire Bishop Gene Robinson, the first openly gay bishop in the Episcopal Church, will preach. The next day, St. Thomas plans what it calls a “celebration and blessing” of such marriages.The Rev. Paul Klitzke, rector at Ascension, told ENS that he was pleased to have a path toward offering the rites, though the change in the relationship with Sumner gave the congregation pause.“There’s some heartbreak, in that this is not normative,” Klitzke said. “It’s not how the Episcopal Church has operated historically.”Martins invoked the “heartbreak” of such an arrangement in his own message to the Diocese of Springfield in July. He outlined a process in which a congregation’s priest and other leaders will meet with him to discuss their desire to offer the trial rites, and Martins will find another bishop to assume “all the routine components of spiritual, pastoral, and sacramental oversight” for the congregation.“Because all liturgical and sacramental ministry is an extension of the ministry of the bishop, and implicates the entire diocese in whatever is done, there must be a robust firewall between a community that receives same-sex marriage into its life, along with its clergy, and the rest of the diocese, including and especially the bishop,” Martins said.Martins offered an update of sorts in December for Living Church, saying one parish in the diocese had asked to use the same-sex marriage rites, “and we are trying to hammer out the details.” The diocese did not return an ENS email seeking more information, including the name of the parish.In Central Florida, ENS reported in August there was little expectation that congregations would face a DEPO arrangement or disruption of their pastoral relationships with Brewer, other than inviting another bishop to provide oversight of same-sex marriage.However, in December, the Rev. Alison Harrity, rector at St. Richard’s Episcopal Church in Winter Park, told ENS that when she informed Brewer that two men of the parish had asked her to perform their marriage, the bishop told her, “St. Richard’s needs a broader oversight.” Brewer delegated episcopal pastoral oversight to Kentucky Bishop Terry Allen White, Harrity said.Brewer “didn’t even say, ‘Let’s have a conversation’; he just gave us away,” Harrity said. However, she added that the DEPO arrangement feels freeing to her and the congregation.St. Richard’s first same-sex wedding will take place Feb. 16 between Bob Cochrane and Felix Rodriguez. Cochrane proposed to his partner of 30 years during Eucharist on All Saints’ Sunday, after Harrity had blessed some other couples who were celebrating anniversaries.North Dakota Bishop Michael Smith said just after convention that DEPO will serve as “a roadmap for these matters” in his diocese and he required any rector or priest-in-charge who wanted to use the rites to first contact him for “supplemental episcopal pastoral care.” St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Fargo has had a DEPO arrangement since December 2015 and has been solemnizing same-sex marriages since then. Smith told ENS this week that the church in the eastern part of the diocese is the only one to request such permission.Meanwhile, uncertainty remains in AlbanyLove has refused to allow such marriages, even in the three Diocese of Albany parishes that have been in DEPO relationships with neighboring dioceses since 2012.The Rev. Mary White, rector of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Albany, one of the three congregations in a DEPO relationship, told ENS that the members of her parish and others in the diocese who favor B012 are biding their time to see what Episcopal Church leaders can negotiate with Love. “I think people are trying not to get their hopes up” about whether same-sex marriages will take place in the diocese, she said.Coincidentally, Love visited St. Andrew’s the Sunday that B012 went into effect for his previously planned routine visit. Love and DEPO bishops all provide such pastoral rites as confirmation, according to White.Love brought the controversy into his Christmas message, likening his journey to the unanswered questions that Mary and Joseph faced when they responded to God’s call. “Are we, like Mary and Joseph, willing to risk our reputations, our relationships, our jobs and livelihood?” he asked in part.White said St. Andrew’s has always supported the stances of the wider Episcopal Church and “we look forward to the day when we can do that openly.” To have diocesan support in that effort “would be a phenomenal thing, but I don’t know if that would ever happen.” And, she said, it would “be such a gift” if the diocese stood in line with the wider church.Asked how she would wish the controversy to conclude, White said, “The perfect ending would be if Bishop Love would acquiesce to convention and allow us to marry same-sex couples, but that’s not going to happen, so I don’t know if there’s a perfect ending.“No matter what happens, it’s going to cause a fair amount turmoil in the diocese.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter. David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Celebrations planned, tension lingers a month after marriage equality resolution takes effect Same-sex couples still facing hurdles to marriage in seven dioceses New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group General Convention 2018, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Resolution B012, Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

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