Cipla Quality Chemicals Industries Limited (CIPLA.ug) HY2021 Interim Report

first_imgCipla Quality Chemicals Industries Limited (CIPLA.ug) listed on the Uganda Securities Exchange under the Pharmaceuticals sector has released it’s 2021 interim results for the half year.For more information about Cipla Quality Chemicals Industries Limited reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations visit the Cipla Quality Chemicals Industries Limited company page on AfricanFinancials.Indicative Share Trading Liquidity The total indicative share trading liquidity for Cipla Quality Chemicals Industries Limited (CIPLA.ug) in the past 12 months, as of 2nd June 2021, is US$71.93K (UGX264.08M). An average of US$5.99K (UGX22.01M) per month.Cipla Quality Chemicals Industries Limited Interim Results for the Half Year DocumentCompany ProfileCipla Quality Chemical Industries Limited is a pharmaceutical manufacturing company located in Kampala, Uganda. The company manufactures Anti-retroviral (ARVs), Artemisinin-based Combination Therapies (ACTs) and Hepatitis medicines to treat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and Hepatitis. Cipla Quality Chemicals Industries Limited is listed on the Uganda Securities Exchangelast_img read more

Forget a Cash ISA! I’d buy this 6% yield trust for a richer, stress-free retirement

first_img Tom Rodgers | Wednesday, 22nd January, 2020 | More on: HFEL Enter Your Email Address Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Forget a Cash ISA! I’d buy this 6% yield trust for a richer, stress-free retirement Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Image source: Getty Images. center_img I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” In this low-interest-rate environment, getting a decent return on your money is harder than it looks.Cash ISAs are often recommended as a relatively safe place to park your hard-earned cash. But even the best easy-access accounts only offer a paltry 1.4% return a year. £10,000 parked in the best-performing Cash ISA would yield just £140 in its first year.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Interest at these levels adds only a couple of pounds a year to your compound multiplier. If rates drop further as they have done in the eurozone, your returns will be even smaller.High yieldBut there is a way to get higher returns without too much effort. Just like a Cash ISA, with a Stocks and Shares ISA, you get any capital gains or dividends tax-free.If you made the choice to put your ISA money into a 6% yielding trust instead of cash, you would be £460 richer at the end of year one.In the second year, your investment you would make you £636 (£10,600 x 0.6). After five years, your initial £10,000 turns into £13,382.25, adding £757.49 across the 12 months.At a consistent 6% yield, over 10 years this single investment would add £17,908.48 to your pension pot. Such are the incredible gains to be had reinvesting high-yield dividends boosted by the power of compound interest. By my calculations, over the same period, with your money wasting away in a 1.4% inflation-lagging Cash ISA you would be £6,416.90 worse off.DiversifyWhere would I put my money if I was buying into a trust? Well first, it is worth noting that FTSE Russell, which runs the London Stock Exchange, has an interesting piece of research showing that over the last 12 years, pension funds heavily skewed their portfolios to domestic stocks and shares. We’ve all heard how important it is to diversify our holdings, but it’s interesting to note that the largest asset managers are very focused on buying UK companies.This could be a mistake as the findings show that “maintaining a home bias in asset allocations has been extremely costly” for UK investors.I think buying shares in a trust that owns the best-of-the-best in terms of overseas assets is a relatively low-risk way to diversify your portfolio while still bringing in market-beating returns.Henderson Far East IncomeThe LSE’s Henderson Far East Income (LSE:HFEL) is returning upwards of a 6% yield from its collection of Chinese, Korean and Taiwanese real estate, financial, tech and digital companies.There is a wide geographical and sector spread, with the largest holdings being the world’s biggest semiconductor foundry Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co, Beijing-based utilities firm China Yangtze Power, and Hong Kong telecommunications giant HKT Trust, which currently turns over £3.2bn a year.In the last 12 months, investors have paid an average 1.84% premium to buy shares in the HEFL trust compared to the net asset value (NAV) of the £515m in stocks it holds. Such is the support for this product. At time of writing that premium is around 2.2% so waiting for a dip may pay off long term.It’s your money. It’s your choice. But by seeing the value in spreading your portfolio net a little wider, effectively with the flick of a switch and trust in the power of compounding, you could make yourself thousands of pounds better off. I know what I’d do. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Tom Rodgers has no position in the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. See all posts by Tom Rodgerslast_img read more

Forget gold and Bitcoin. Here’s how I’d invest today to achieve financial freedom

first_img The spread of coronavirus has contributed to a substantial fall in the share prices of a wide range of companies in the first couple of months of 2020. In the near term, this trend could continue depending on the severity of the spread of the disease.By contrast, the prices of gold and Bitcoin have made gains since the start of the year. This could mean that investors determine that now is the right time to buy them, since they could continue their recent trends over the coming months.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…However, the track record of the stock market suggests that buying during its downturns is a shrewd move. As such, purchasing a variety of shares today could improve your chances of achieving financial freedom in the long run.Risks aheadThe stock market’s performance could continue to be weak in the short run. Investor sentiment has deteriorated significantly over the past few months, and could remain at a lower level than it has done in recent years.One reason for this is that the world economy faces numerous risks at the present time. As well as coronavirus, there are political challenges in the US and UK, while the performance of major economies such as the EU and China have been somewhat disappointing in recent months. These factors could cause investors to maintain a cautious stance towards equities, which may equate to reduced demand for stocks in the coming months.Track recordOf course, stock market declines are not a new phenomenon. Share prices have experienced booms and busts since their inception. Historically, the stock market has always recovered from even its worst bear markets. Therefore, investors who are able to purchase companies while they trade on low valuations could be rewarded with high returns in the subsequent recovery phase.At the present time, many stocks appear to offer good value for money. Investors seem to have priced in the potential for a worsening of the global economic outlook. This may mean that investors are able to buy high-quality shares while they offer wide margins of safety, which could enable them to generate high portfolio returns in the long run.DiversificationClearly, the prospects for the world economy are uncertain right now. As such, while specific sectors such as consumer goods, retail and banking may appear to be relatively attractive, diversifying across a wide range of industries could be a sensible move. It may reduce your overall risk, and could enable you to capitalise on strong growth rates from a variety of sectors.Although in the short run the stock market may underperform assets such as gold and Bitcoin, in the long run its current valuation suggests that it can deliver impressive returns which boost your financial prospects. Therefore, now could be the right time to focus your capital on undervalued shares. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Forget gold and Bitcoin. Here’s how I’d invest today to achieve financial freedom Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Image source: Getty Images I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Enter Your Email Address See all posts by Peter Stephens Peter Stephens | Thursday, 12th March, 2020 last_img read more

The Lloyds Bank share price is up 14% in June. Here’s what I’m doing now

first_img “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Image source: Getty Images. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Enter Your Email Address Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this.center_img The Lloyds Bank share price is up 14% in June. Here’s what I’m doing now Manika Premsingh | Wednesday, 10th June, 2020 | More on: LLOY When I wrote about the FTSE 100 banking biggie Lloyds Banking Group  (LSE: LLOY) last week, its share price was already rising fast. The Lloyds Bank share price has shown even more impressive gains in the space of the past week. As a result, it’s up by 14% since the start of June alone. Lloyds Bank share price has been depressed since the financial crisisThis is a far bigger gain than the 2.7% increase of the FTSE 100 index during this time. I had anticipated a short-term increase in the Lloyds Bank share price last week. My reasoning was that it would be driven partly by momentum and partly by investors that are still bottom fishing. But at the Motley Fool, we are looking at stocks that can pay off for the investor in the long term. There are two ways in which this can happen. The first is dependable dividend income. The second is capital appreciation. Ideally, a combination of the two is best. 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Lloyds Bank is weak on both counts. It suspended dividends in March, as a precautionary measure when the country went into lockdown. As far as capital growth goes, the fact is that LLOY has underperformed for years now. Even at the height of the financial crisis in 2008, which affected the banking and financial services sector directly, the share price was still higher than it’s now. Bank’s business confidence survey results are weakIt’s possible, of course, that the trend can change for the Lloyds Bank share price in the future. For investors who are bullish on the economy’s prospects in particular, the bank could look like a winning buy. I’m not one of them. Consider this. LLOY’s own business confidence survey shows dismal results. The release’s headline reads “Business confidence falls to a record low as economic shutdown continues”. It further adds that despite easing of restrictions, trading conditions are difficult for business.Not everything is gloom and doom, though. It does point to initial signs of turnaround. That’s hardly a boom, however. And to me, expecting banks to boom now is a gamble. It’s an even bigger gamble considering that another stock market crash is likely. Many of my colleagues at the Motley Fool have pointed this out in the past days, as have I. I reckon that the likes of the Lloyds Bank share price are most vulnerable to such crashes, given their cyclical nature. Some alternative investment ideasSince the Lloyds Bank share price appears to be a gamble now, my question is this: Why wouldn’t I go for more predictable stocks that are already giving good returns and whose prospects look good? Two examples from my own crash-time investments are the FTSE 100 cyclical stocks JD Sports Fashion and Burberry. Both were hit hard, but have already shown spectacular comebacks. And these are just two instances. There are far more that have high investing appeal, never mind the low Lloyds Bank share price. Even if it’s in for better times, I’d much rather wait for more proof of it.  Manika Premsingh has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Lloyds Banking Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. See all posts by Manika Premsinghlast_img read more

The FTSE 100 fell 200 points in a day! Here’s my 3-point action plan for another market crash

first_img Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Image source: Getty Images Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Jonathan Smith and The Motley Fool UK have no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The FTSE 100 fell 200 points in a day! Here’s my 3-point action plan for another market crash I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997”center_img See all posts by Jonathan Smith Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Enter Your Email Address Since the stock market crash in March, the FTSE 100 index has recovered remarkably well. At the start of the week, the index was trading around 6,500 points. This is still down over a thousand points from the start of the year, but it’s certainly better than when it traded below 5,000 points in the first quarter.If you’re a regular reader of content on The Motley Fool, you’ll have noticed a number of articles talking about a second stock market slump recently. In the short term, there was a lot of rational thinking that the rally was getting ahead of itself, given the disconnect between the FTSE 100 and broader economic conditions. Yesterday we may have seen the start of this market crash, with the FTSE 100 shedding 223 points in a single session, to trade down at around 6,100 points.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…DisconnectedAny good investor keeps a finger on the pulse of the market and compares it to what the situation is like in the broader economy. If there’s a large disconnect, then something isn’t quite right. Over the past few weeks, the FTSE 100 has been performing exceptionally well. But there have clearly been issues regarding the UK (and world) economy. We’ve had figures out today showing that GDP fell by 20.4% in April, a staggering number. We’ve also had escalating tensions between the US and China and fears over a second wave of the coronavirus internationally. As a logical thinker, it seems a second stock market slump in the near term could be here, in response to the above. So here’s what I’m doing.FTSE 100 slump action planFirstly, I’m making a wish list of stocks that look attractive to me for the long term. For example, Rolls-Royce has been on my list for the past month or so. I could have bought it earlier this week, but since Tuesday, the share price is down 17%. The second slump has already provided me with a great discount to buy the firm at. I’ll monitor news for the next week or so, but this looks like a good opportunity to buy the dip in the market.Further, I’m looking at my overall allocation within my portfolio again. Interest rates are still at low levels (0.1%) and the commentary coming out of the Bank of England isn’t positive. I doubt interest rates will be moving higher any time soon. So with a second FTSE 100 slump looking apparent, it makes sense to move out of cash and into stocks.For this I’d be looking at making my cash work harder for income, so would be targeting safe dividend paying shares. I recently wrote about Vodafone, which showed a year-end operating profit of €4bn. With ample cash flow, the dividend yield of over 5% looks a good home for income hunters. A second market slump will only increase the dividend yield.Stay investedFinally, for stocks I’m already in the red on thanks to the first market crash, my action plan is to stay invested. The second slump may hit hard in the short term. But in the long term, history shows that patience is always rewarded! Jonathan Smith | Friday, 12th June, 2020 last_img read more

Investing in the UK recession? Here are my top three tips to help you thrive

first_img Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. See all posts by Rachael FitzGerald-Finch Investing in the UK recession? Here are my top three tips to help you thrive Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Image source: Getty Images Rachael FitzGerald-Finch has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.center_img Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Rachael FitzGerald-Finch | Thursday, 13th August, 2020 It’s official. We’re in a UK recession for the first time in 11 years. The economy shrank by 20.4% over the last quarter, the biggest drop in gross domestic product (GDP) on record.Firms are grappling with tough market conditions right across the FTSE. Declining revenues, higher debt, and lower productivity are the norm for many.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…However, by watching the market for high-quality companies at discounted prices, investing opportunities will emerge. And by looking for companies with strong balance sheets, low debt, and good cash flow, you can thrive by investing during the UK recession.Here’s how you can identify them.  A strong balance sheetThe balance sheet is essentially a photograph of what a firm owns (assets) and what it owes (debts) at any one point in time. A strong balance sheet will have a ‘current’ ratio of around 1.5 to 2.0. The current ratio determines the relative levels of short-term assets and liabilities. If this ratio is too high, a firm may be accumulating cash. If it’s too low, a company may struggle with its short-term liquidity needs.The quick ratio is an even more conservative liquidity estimate because it only considers assets that are cash-convertible. To calculate it, subtract the inventory and pre-paid expenses from the current assets and divide this net figure by the current liabilities. The ideal quick ratio figure is 1 or more. These ratios are only guides, but they can help to determine the strength of balance sheet liquidity in the short term. But bear in mind that all ratios will vary per industry.Regardless, companies with strong balance sheets can withstand tightening of credit conditions and better manage their debt.Low debtAnother useful number to know is the debt-to-equity (D/E) ratio. D/E shows what is owed against what is owned. Usually, the lower this ratio the better, but if a company has no debt, it cannot offset it against tax, potentially lowering profits.However, companies with high amounts of debt will likely make large interest payments, increasing the debt-to-equity ratio. In a recession, investing in highly leveraged companies is risky because they’re more likely to fail. Low debt, and a lower debt-to-equity ratio of 1.0 to 1.5, is best.    Good cash flow: essential to beat a UK recessionLastly, a firm needs to be good at generating cash to see it through the bad times.The debt service coverage ratio (DSCR) determines whether a company’s income is enough to pay its debts. Usually, a higher ratio of 1.15 to 1.35 is better. Calculate it by dividing net operating income by current debt. However, cash may have been received by selling assets or taking on more long-term debt. Calculating free cash flow (FCF) in addition to the DSCR helps determine real profitability.FCF is the cash left after the firm has paid for dividends, debt, or stock buybacks. It’s what’s left over to invest or return to shareholders. A positive FCF is a good sign.In addition to the above, some industries will be more recession-resistant than others. For example, utilities, discount retailers or consumer staples will be safe havens for many. But this may push up share prices in the short-to-medium term. Regardless, for a vigilant investor with an eye on the right industries and metrics, the UK recession really could provide opportunities to find high-quality companies at discount prices.   Enter Your Email Address I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement.last_img read more

The week’s stock market news – Friday, 30th October

first_imgThe week’s stock market news – Friday, 30th October Markets around the world are reeling from the coronavirus pandemic…And with so many great companies trading at what look to be ‘discount-bin’ prices, now could be the time for savvy investors to snap up some potential bargains.But whether you’re a newbie investor or a seasoned pro, deciding which stocks to add to your shopping list can be daunting prospect during such unprecedented times.Fortunately, The Motley Fool is here to help: our UK Chief Investment Officer and his analyst team have short-listed five companies that they believe STILL boast significant long-term growth prospects despite the global lock-down…You see, here at The Motley Fool we don’t believe “over-trading” is the right path to financial freedom in retirement; instead, we advocate buying and holding (for AT LEAST three to five years) 15 or more quality companies, with shareholder-focused management teams at the helm.That’s why we’re sharing the names of all five of these companies in a special investing report that you can download today for FREE. If you’re 50 or over, we believe these stocks could be a great fit for any well-diversified portfolio, and that you can consider building a position in all five right away. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Enter Your Email Address See all posts by Alan Oscroft 5 Stocks For Trying To Build Wealth After 50 Click here to claim your free copy of this special investing report now! Alan Oscroft owns shares of Lloyds Banking Group. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of Next. The Motley Fool UK has recommended GlaxoSmithKline, HSBC Holdings, and Lloyds Banking Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.center_img Alan Oscroft | Friday, 30th October, 2020 Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. The UK stock market had a tough week this week, as the spectre of Covid-19 is rising again and local lockdowns are extending. By midday Friday, the FTSE 100 stood at 5,574 points, down 4.9% on the week. The prospect of London’s top index ending the year above 6,000 points is looking increasingly remote. Banks were in the news this week, releasing third-quarter updates that beat analysts’ expectations. HSBC Holdings was first on Tuesday, posting a $3.1bn pre-tax profit, with an adjusted figure of $4.3bn.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Lloyds Banking Group and NatWest Group both reported returns to profit, on Thursday and Friday respectively. For Lloyds, pre-tax profit came in at £1bn, more than twice the figure expected by analysts. NatWest, meanwhile, recorded an operating profit of £355m, where the City had been expecting another quarterly loss.All three reported decent liquidity, with comfortable CET1 ratios and impairments below expectations. The stock market responded unenthusiastically and shares across the sector didn’t move much.Oil and telecomsIt wasn’t just banks that reported returns to profit this week, as BP did the same. BP is in the midst of possibly the biggest upheaval in its history, as it retargets itself at renewable energy and aims to reach net zero status by 2050. Against that background, an adjusted Q3 profit of $86m didn’t impress, especially when compared to $2,254m for Q3 2019. With a forecast 2021 yield of 9%, BP’s dividend is among the stock market’s biggest.On the subject of dividends, this year Royal Dutch Shell ended its run of never having cut its dividend since World War II. And though the Q3 dividend is up a bit at 17c, it’s still way down on 2019’s 47c. Adjusted earnings, reported Thursday, beat the Q2 figure at $955m. But we need to contrast that with last year’s $4.77bn.BT Group, whose shares are down nearly 50% in the stock market crash, saw its shares blip upwards Thursday. First-half results provided the drive, though revenue was down 8% with pre-tax profit falling 20%. But there was optimism for the future, as the telecoms giant lifted its full-year earnings guidance and spoke of “sustainable growth” going forward.Stock market beaterNext, meanwhile, gave us some idea of how fashion retail is going with a Q3 update Wednesday. Full-price sales in the quarter were up 2.8% on last year, with total sales up 1.4%. The nine-month period was tougher, with full-price sales down 20%, mind. The company has lifted its full-year guidance, and now expects profit to reach £365m, which is £65m better than September’s hopes. Year-end debt should fall by £487m to £625m. Next’s online channels helped its sales, though, and others in the sector won’t be doing so well.Pharmaceuticals companies are popular now, for obvious reasons, but GlaxoSmithKline shares are not weathering the stock market crash well. They’re down 27% so far in 2020, and weren’t helped by Wednesday’s report of a 3% decline in Q3 revenue to £8.6bn. That was below analyst expectations, though adjusted EPS did beat predictions at 35.6p per share. On the current share price, Glaxo offers a forecast 6.2% dividend yield. Image source: Getty Images I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this.last_img read more

Covid-19 vaccine news sends markets crazy! Here’s what I’m doing right now

first_img Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. No more social distancing. No more masks. No more lockdowns. No more fear over infecting our parents or kids. No more panic over cleaning every surface. That’s the promise of a Covid-19 vaccine. So it’s no wonder the news that Pfizer produced positive results from its Covid-19 vaccine trial sent stock markets crazy on Monday, 9 November. 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…The FTSE 100 bounced over 5% to levels not seen in months. Travel stocks like IAG and Carnival jumped more than 30% in a single day. Covid-19 vaccine: what I’m doing now My initial reaction was to do something. Anything. Capitalise. Buy something or sell something. Any careful, proven investing strategy I might have developed went out of the window. The adrenalin swept through me, immediately turning my logic centres to mush.On the other end of the scale from fear and volatility are exuberance and joy. And that’s something that many people will be feeling. Not just from an investing point of view, but on a human level. I’m a hugger, you see. I’ve not been able to hug any strangers for nine months. It’s been torture. The idea that this dark period might be coming to an end with a Covid-19 vaccine? I’m opening the champagne. But investing? No. Not today, at least.The hero we needNews of a potential Covid-19 vaccine has produced extremes of emotion. Whenever I’m feeling like this I usually turn to Benjamin Graham. He’s not alive any more. In fact he died in 1976. But the author of The Intelligent Investor has been my constant companion on my investing journey. He usually has words of wisdom for every occasion. It’s no wonder Warren Buffett idolised his mentor so much. The ones I’m choosing today are: “The investor’s chief problem — even his worst enemy — is likely to be himself.”Perhaps the number one worst time to invest is when I’m feeling emotional. It’s certainly been the biggest killer of investment gains for me. Excitement leads me to risk more money than I should. Fear leads me to sell more shares than I actually wanted to. I wrote at the very start of this mad period — the worst stock market crash since 1987 — that I would turn off my phone. I said I’d also delete my investing apps to prevent any mistakes I’d regret. I think that’s probably solid advice for today as well. My conclusionIf we think that normality can return to the world on the basis of this Covid-19 vaccine news, I see that as an overreaction. The Pfizer vaccine is still in phase 3 trials and the data has not been peer-reviewed yet. The pharma giant itself has said that the reported 90% efficacy rate could still fall. So there is much still to do before we have a solution to the coronavirus crisis.  And investors who have been hoovering up cheap UK shares by the thousands and waiting for the bounce? They’ll probably be fighting to log on to their investing apps to take short-term profits.So this searing market rise may not last. While today might be a day to hug my family, it’s probably best for me to leave any investing decisions until the extreme emotion has subsided, I feel. Image source: Getty Images “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Covid-19 vaccine news sends markets crazy! Here’s what I’m doing right now Tom Rodgers | Monday, 9th November, 2020 center_img I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. See all posts by Tom Rodgers Enter Your Email Address Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares TomRodgers has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.last_img read more

Why the AVEVA share price plunged 20% on Wednesday

first_img TomRodgers has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Image source: Getty Images Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Why the AVEVA share price plunged 20% on Wednesday Enter Your Email Address See all posts by Tom Rodgerscenter_img The AVEVA (LSE:AVV) share price plummeted on Wednesday 25 November to hit a low not seen since April. The frightening drop saw the FTSE 100 software firm lose a total of £1.36bn from its market cap. Outside of a wider market crash, it’s extremely rare to see the share price of stable FTSE 100 companies fall this much.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…And with stock markets building intense bullish pressure in recent days, shareholders might be concerned to see such a steep drop.So what exactly happened?Making it right(s)In early November, it announced a £2.84bn rights issue to help it fund a buyout of US software group OSIsoft. Three months earlier, AVEVA said it had agreed a total £3.8bn takeover bid for the US real-time data producer. CEO Craig Hayman said this at the time the takeover bid was announced: “Combining AVEVA and OSIsoft is yet another significant milestone in our journey to achieving the ambitious growth goals that we have set.”When companies grow to a multi-billion market cap, they often find it difficult to grow organically. Even quite large increases in sales or profits can make little difference to the share price. So that’s why they tend to take over rival companies. That is, if they are able to find a willing participant.The firm’s growth has been steady, rather than spectacular, over the past decade. In that time the AVEVA share price has grown by around 105%, from 1,500p to today’s price.  AVEVA share price downIn order to pay for the massive buyout, AVEVA said it would need to issue 125 million new shares at 2,255p each. Current investors would be allowed to buy seven of these rights issue shares for every nine existing AVEVA shares they own. So if they currently hold 900 of the shares, investors will be entitled to buy 700 new ones.This complex calculation is similar to that faced by Rolls-Royce shareholders recently. In order to raise £2bn to help shore up its balance sheet, the FTSE 100 defence and engineering firm said it would issue 6.4bn new shares. So, for every three shares an investor held, they could buy 10 more at a cheaper price. Heavy discountThe rights issue price of 2,255p came at a 32% discount to what is called the ‘ex-rights issue’ AVEVA share price of 3,338p. That was the value of the share price at the close of business on 5 November 2020, when the plan was announced. So these new shares officially started trading on the morning of Wednesday 25 November. And  markets priced it in. That’s the main reason why the share price fell by 20%.  AVEVA’s largest shareholder is French data-centre provider Schneider Electric. In 2017 the two companies agreed a £3bn merger. Schneider then took a 60% stake in the enlarged business. And it said it would take part in the new rights issue in full.AVEVA said it would find the rest of the money it needs for the OSIsoft takeover by using cash reserves and by issuing shares to OSIsoft co-owner Estudillo Holdings. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Tom Rodgers | Wednesday, 25th November, 2020 | More on: AVV “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool.last_img read more

Here’s why I’ll be investing in shares for the rest of my life

first_imgHere’s why I’ll be investing in shares for the rest of my life Alan Oscroft | Saturday, 23rd January, 2021 I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. See all posts by Alan Oscroft Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Sharescenter_img Alan Oscroft has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Did the 2020 stock market crash put people off investing in shares in a Stocks and Shares ISA? Many will surely now think it’s a bad idea, and that really doesn’t surprise me. After all, by the middle of March, the FTSE 100 had crashed by more than 30% since the start of the year. And FTSE 250 investors had it even harder, sitting on a 40% loss at the low point.I could simply point to the long term and claim that, in the scheme of things, 2020 doesn’t matter. But that alone might not be much comfort to folks approaching retirement and looking at severely diminished pension pots. The traditional answer is to move investments out of shares at least five years before we need the cash. It’s one common approach, but I’m not going to do that.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Now, when I finish investing in shares and start taking income to keep me going, will I need all the cash at once? No, of course I won’t. All I’ll need in the first year will be, well, one year’s income. And even then, I won’t withdraw a full year’s cash in one go. In fact, I’m hoping to have to sell relatively few shares, and live as much as possible on dividends.A big cut in 2020 dividendsSure, dividends have been damaged since the Covid-19 pandemic struck. AJ Bell‘s quarterly Dividend Dashboard is a must-read for me. And figures in the latest one suggest that when the dust settles, FTSE 100 dividend payments will have been slashed by 20% in 2020.That might sound like a disaster, but I see two main reasons why it’s really not such bad news. Firstly, even that reduced level of payout would still represent a yield of 3.2%. That’s some way below the yields of 4% and more that we’re used to. But income from investing in shares is still beating the pants off savings accounts and Cash ISAs.My second reason is that forecasts already point to an 18% rebound in FTSE 100 dividend payments in 2021. That suggests many dividend cuts were perhaps a little over-cautious, and that’s not such a bad thing. I’d always prefer my companies to hold back short-term dividends in order to strengthen my long-term prospects. Then, of course, banks were forced to withhold their dividends by the PRA whether they needed to or not. And it seems they probably didn’t really need to.When will I stop investing in shares?So if I had retired this year, maybe I’d have sold a few shares to make up for the shortfall in dividends. And that would have been at unfavourable prices. But how long would I have to wait for the rest of my portfolio to recover? Well, over the past 12 months, starting around the time the first Covid cases were emerging, the FTSE 100 is now only 12% down. And the FTSE 250 has lost just 6%.If that’s the worst that such a horrendous year can do, it just reinforces my conviction that shares are still my best investments ever, especially if I have at least a five-year horizon. I’ll be investing in shares for life. Image source: Getty Images. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Enter Your Email Address Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this.last_img read more

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